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  1. #1

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    How to remove permanent marker?

    I got a nice wooden film holder. Everything is in excellent condition except that the previous owner used permanent marker to mark the holder for film type. What is the easiest way to remove the mark without damaging the finish? Thanks.

    Jason.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonC View Post
    I got a nice wooden film holder. Everything is in excellent condition except that the previous owner used permanent marker to mark the holder for film type. What is the easiest way to remove the mark without damaging the finish? Thanks.

    Jason.

    I'd be interested in this one too as I have yet to find an answer, regardless of the solvent I have used -- though probably a lot depends on the substrate, e.g. yacht varnish is easier than oiled wood.

    Cheers,

    R.

  3. #3
    BradS's Avatar
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    Try isopropyl alcohol, cotton balls and a lot of elbow grease. It works if you work at it long enough.
    Last edited by BradS; 02-14-2007 at 12:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
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    Tough question. On metals, Lacquer thinnner takes the marker off with one wipe, but will probably also take the finish off the holder too. However, even if it does, its not a big deal to give the holder another coat of lacquer.

    Due to the nature of lacquer, it will "melt" any old finish and adhere, no need for sanding the old finish.

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonC View Post
    What is the easiest way to remove the mark without damaging the finish?

    Jason.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonC View Post
    I got a nice wooden film holder. Everything is in excellent condition except that the previous owner used permanent marker to mark the holder for film type. What is the easiest way to remove the mark without damaging the finish? Thanks.

    Jason.
    I assume we're talking about removing marker from the opaque white part of the top of the dark slide, right? Then, I would try a little nail polish remover on a cotton bud. Try just a tiny little spot. Pour some nail polish into the lid that came with that bottle, dip the cotton swab, squeeze it as dry as you can, and then rub firmly over a small section as a test. Then rinse with a soapy swab, followed by a fresh water swab or cloth. It MIGHT take some of the high gloss off the plastic, but it won't melt it.

    I have successfully removed permanent marker from white plastic objects before using this method, but it really depends on the marker and the material bearing the writing.

  6. #6
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    In bygone years I have found naptha (lighter fluid) fairly effective on magic marker ink. As solvents go, it's fairly benign (but very flammable).

    DaveT

  7. #7
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    The "Sharpie" brand markers seem to be alcohol-soluble, but if the ink has been there for a long time it may have diffused into the finish and be more or less impossible to remove completely. The good news is that when you find a solvent that doesn't touch the ink, you can look for a "repair" finish that doesn't mix with that solvent, to paint over it without bleed-through. This is the principle behind using shellac (alcohol-soluble) to seal resin pockets and knots in pine (turpentine-soluble, like varnish). In your case, of course, you probably want something of appropriate color and gloss that is alcohol-resistant. (Model-airplane dope is a likely candidate, because the engine fuels are alcohol-based; for flat white, consider White-Out or similar correction fluid.)

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Yes, naphtha works for permanent marker, and it is easy on fine wood finishes in general (it was first recommended to me by a guitar repair technician).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #9
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    PEC-12 Photo emulsion cleaner will take off ink. Don't know what it will do to other finishes.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  10. #10

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    If the finish on the holder is shellac, then the alcohol will disolve it. However, like lacquer, it's easy to blend in new finish.

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