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  1. #11
    Freneticist's Avatar
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    Here is another reason to do it right. Camera was bought for $30. Took me two weeks to get to this point just a couple hours in the evenings and a couple week-ends. Makes a big diff. It may not shoot any better, but it sure looks a helluva lot better. I am not ashamed to take it for a walk around the block.

    http://century-camera.livejournal.com

  2. #12

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    It looks really nice so far, great job!

  3. #13

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    Surely a lot depends on the history and value. An indifferent camera of modest value -- restore it as far as you possibly can. But after discussing my 12x15 inch Gandolfi Universal (c. 1900) with Gandolfi, I decded it was better to leave the history evident. I'm going to replace one fitting that was originally brass and is now chrome (?), and the tie-rods that have crystallized, but the rest stays like it was.

    Cheers,

    R.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    Surely a lot depends on the history and value. An indifferent camera of modest value -- restore it as far as you possibly can. ..... I decided it was better to leave the history evident....
    R.
    Agree. Wholeheartedly. For collectible's, too often their value is diminished by the work done to them. Especially by hobbyists such as myself. The Century was actually more of a "rebuild" than a restore. It had no value as it was, so there was no loss to what I did to it. Now it's value is either display or shooter. I will be using for the latter. But and if a camera has no intrinsic value in the condition it is in, then IMO, go for the whole nine yards.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragc View Post
    Thanks.

    It's an old Asanuma & Co. (Asanuma Shokai) King 1 English style half plate camera, pre-WWII Japanese. I built 4x5 and 5x7 backs for it from old B&J backs and installed Satin Snow screens on both, cleaned it (the finish is original), polished the brass, and had new bellows made for it. The strap is a dog's collar. The tripod base is plywood, left with the plies visible, bolted to the old-style tripod slots with ground blots that allow the rear and front extensions to move unimpeded, and two spirit levels from a cheap plastic carpenter's level, mounted with brass tubing. Lenses are a 90mm Schneider Angulon, a 150mm Fuji Fujinon and a 210/370mm Schneider Symmar convertible. It looked pretty bad when I got it for a song...now it's my baby!
    That is a very nice looking camera. It looks a lot like my 5X7 Nagaoka, though it does not appear to have some of the movements of the Nagaoka (rear and front swings, front swing and tilt, for example). However, the carrying handle on my camera is also a small dog collar, the orginal leather having bit the dust some years ago.

    People who see these type of cameas assume they are very fragile. My 5X7 Nagaoka is close to 25 years in age and still sets up very rigid. The English field type camera, from which your camera and mine are evolved, was a remarkable design for function and light weight.

    Sandy King
    Last edited by sanking; 04-02-2007 at 02:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    Surely a lot depends on the history and value. An indifferent camera of modest value -- restore it as far as you possibly can. But after discussing my 12x15 inch Gandolfi Universal (c. 1900) with Gandolfi, I decded it was better to leave the history evident. I'm going to replace one fitting that was originally brass and is now chrome (?), and the tie-rods that have crystallized, but the rest stays like it was.

    Cheers,

    R.
    It is in generally a bad decision from an economic point of view to re-finish anything that has a lot of collector value. Even high quality re-finishing will often detract rather than add to the value. I would certainly be very cautious, as Roger has been with the old Gandolfi, in making any changes that were not absolutley necessary.

    BTW, with regard to the specific question of this thread, I would definitely re-finish the triple-extension camera if in the condition you describe. You will give it more user value for sure, and unless it happens to be a very rare model, in the present condition it likely does not have much collector value.


    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 04-02-2007 at 04:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    ragc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    That is a very nice looking camera. It looks a lot like my 5X7 Nagaoka, though it does not appear to have some of the movements of the Nagaoka (rear and front swings, front swing and tilt, for example). However, the carrying handle on my camera is also a small dog collar, the orginal leather having bit the dust some years ago.

    People who see these type of cameas assume they are very fragile. My 5X7 Nagaoka is close to 25 years in age and still sets up very rigid. The English field type camera, from which your camera and mine are evolved, was a remarkable design for function and light weight.

    Sandy King
    From what I have been able to find out, Asanuma is a distributor who used to brand the products as "King". The probable maker of my camara was Tanakaichi, the predecessor of Nagaoka. So you see, your observation is very accurate. The camera does have front tilt and rise/fall, and rear tilt and swing. It lacks front swing. It also has a droppable bed. And again, you are right about it being much tougher than it looks (and also extremely light!).

    I actually had the original leather strap break in my hand the day I got it!

    I love it, and it is a great camera out in the field in both 4x5 and 5x7 formats.

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