Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,517   Posts: 1,572,182   Online: 1093
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Dust in my lens

  1. #11
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    Does Nikon still service old manual focus lenses? I heard that they have stopped servicing film cameras except for the F6 and FM10.
    Where, when etc. did you "hear" this? Or is it an unsubstantiated web-rumor you are passing along?

    I know nothing about these folks - but they seem to be ready, willing and able to service just about any Nikon there is and have an impressive "pedigree"!

    http://www.authorizedphoto.com/

    Obviously, I have no connection with these folk - but thought that the info was worth passing along.

  2. #12
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    . . . there is also what appears to be a small spider web-like pattern on one of the inside elements. . . .
    That may be fungus, which is worse than dust, and will spread. Some people recommend killing the fungus by setting the lens in the sun so you get direct sunlight on the fungus.

  3. #13
    snegron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Hot, Muggy, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    805
    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    Where, when etc. did you "hear" this? Or is it an unsubstantiated web-rumor you are passing along?

    I know nothing about these folks - but they seem to be ready, willing and able to service just about any Nikon there is and have an impressive "pedigree"!

    http://www.authorizedphoto.com/

    Obviously, I have no connection with these folk - but thought that the info was worth passing along.
    I'm not sure if you are new to the internet, but if you have ever visited any other camera-related website other than Apug, I'm sure you have read about how Nikon will no longer be servicing film cameras other than the F6 or the FM10. Not to mention articles in photography magazines as well.

    Don't get me wrong, I love film, but the reality is (and you can confirm this by logging on to the Nikon website (www.nikonusa.com) that they currently manufacture more digital equipment than they do film equipment. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that they are steadily phasing out their film equipment. How profitable is it for them to keep a large inventory of film camera parts if they are constantly introducing new DSLR's several times a year? If you don't believe me, try ordering parts for a Nikon FTN viewfinder. Better yet, try ordering parts for an F2 or F3 (other than the little round F3HP viewfinder glass that the F3HP shares with the D1X).

    Maybe it's just my wild imagination, but have you noticed that they have discontinued the majority of their manual focus lenses and replaced them with autofocus lenses? Their website only lists 4 manual focus lenses. None of these is the 105mm 2.5.

  4. #14
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    I'm not sure if you are new to the internet, but if you have ever visited any other camera-related website other than Apug, I'm sure you have read about how Nikon will no longer be servicing film cameras other than the F6 or the FM10. Not to mention articles in photography magazines as well.

    Don't get me wrong, I love film, but the reality is (and you can confirm this by logging on to the Nikon website (www.nikonusa.com) that they currently manufacture more digital equipment than they do film equipment. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that they are steadily phasing out their film equipment. How profitable is it for them to keep a large inventory of film camera parts if they are constantly introducing new DSLR's several times a year? If you don't believe me, try ordering parts for a Nikon FTN viewfinder. Better yet, try ordering parts for an F2 or F3 (other than the little round F3HP viewfinder glass that the F3HP shares with the D1X).

    Maybe it's just my wild imagination, but have you noticed that they have discontinued the majority of their manual focus lenses and replaced them with autofocus lenses? Their website only lists 4 manual focus lenses. None of these is the 105mm 2.5.
    I am hardly new to the internet.

    Yes, I fully expect that NikonUSA will only service F6 and FM10 film cameras because those are the only film cameras it produces that are under warranty.

    It is eminently evident that NikonUSA will limit all of its direct servicing only to cameras under warranty - whether they are film or digital. This particularly makes sense with digital gear since it is generally not worth repairing when it malfunctions. So by providing direct "warranty repair" for such gear they always have the option of simply replacing the camera.

    Now, if you had visited the site I posted, you would have found out that it is a former NikonUSA servicing location that is now operating independently of Nikon. It is a "spin off" operation. These folks are undoubtedly one of the best means of obtaining manufacturer-level quality servicing for Nikon film cameras of any vintage. [Note: I have not connection to them.]

    As to the matter of discontinued manual primes - that is yesterday's news. Why bring it up over a year after it was announced? And since you did so, why ignore the fact that Zeiss (with a Cosina tie-in) has introduced a line of F-mount manual primes that essentially replace the discontinued focal lengths?

    Finally, was it the intention of your original post to seek a source for Nikon film camera servicing and repair? Or was it to just vent?

    The nature of camera manufacturing and after-sale product support have fundamentally changed in the digital era. That does not mean that we analog-types have been abandoned. It just means we have to adapt to new sources for the services we require!

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    It sounds like Nikon in Japan is different from the one in the U.S., but usually it's the other way around that you get more assured and better services than we do over here.

    Anyway my uderstanding is that a couple of their older manual cameras like F3 and New FM2 still have a few more years to go until their oficial service term ends in 2010. Nikon here will have replacement parts for these cameras until then, but that doesn't mean they can always fix everything.

    But again for lens-cleaning, just pick a place near you, like if you know where good trusty used camera shops like KEH send their used cameras and lenses to for the cleaning and overhaul, that's where you should send yours also.

  6. #16
    snegron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Hot, Muggy, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    805
    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    I am hardly new to the internet.

    Yes, I fully expect that NikonUSA will only service F6 and FM10 film cameras because those are the only film cameras it produces that are under warranty.

    It is eminently evident that NikonUSA will limit all of its direct servicing only to cameras under warranty - whether they are film or digital. This particularly makes sense with digital gear since it is generally not worth repairing when it malfunctions. So by providing direct "warranty repair" for such gear they always have the option of simply replacing the camera.

    Now, if you had visited the site I posted, you would have found out that it is a former NikonUSA servicing location that is now operating independently of Nikon. It is a "spin off" operation. These folks are undoubtedly one of the best means of obtaining manufacturer-level quality servicing for Nikon film cameras of any vintage. [Note: I have not connection to them.]

    As to the matter of discontinued manual primes - that is yesterday's news. Why bring it up over a year after it was announced? And since you did so, why ignore the fact that Zeiss (with a Cosina tie-in) has introduced a line of F-mount manual primes that essentially replace the discontinued focal lengths?

    Finally, was it the intention of your original post to seek a source for Nikon film camera servicing and repair? Or was it to just vent?

    The nature of camera manufacturing and after-sale product support have fundamentally changed in the digital era. That does not mean that we analog-types have been abandoned. It just means we have to adapt to new sources for the services we require!

    Thank you for the link!

    As for the introduction of Zeiss lenses for Nikon, I have mixed feelings about that. Since the late 1960's, Nikon has produced a line of professional grade lenses at a higher price and series of lenses for the general (albeit discriminating) consumer at a lower price. Since the late 1960's (or maybe before that) there have been numerous "independent" lens companies that have produced lenses for Nikon cameras (think Sigma, Tokina, Soligor, Takumar, Vivitar, etc). IMO, there will always be "independent" lenses made for Nikon cameras. Zeiss is another independent lens manufacturer. Yes, I'm sure it is probably higher quality than a Soligor, but it's not a Nikkor. It is probably sharper, better built, and more desireable than a Nikon lens, but it is not a Nikkor. If you have tons of cash to spend on these new Zeiss lenses for Nikon, great. For the rest of us who were fortunate enough to live during an era when Nikon produced affordable, high quality optics for the the rest of us (like the 105mm 2.5), it is a sad realization that Nikon has opted for producing lower quality auto focus optics and is slowly phasing out their higher quality manual focus optics. Yes, I know there are exceptions to my autofocus-bashing generalization like the 17-55mm 2.8, 180mm 2.8, and their large (and ridiculously expensive) telephoto S series lenses.

    As for my original post, there was no need to read between the lines. I was very clear on what I was asking, how to remove the dust from inside the lens. Should I do it myself, or is it something best left for an experienced technician? I have absolutely no idea where you got the impression that I was venting. If I wanted to "vent" I would have gotten on my self rightous pedestal and gone on one of my long winded narratives describing my feelings of disgust and dissapointment toward the growing trend of large camera manufacturers shoving a concept down our throats of what they believe is in "our" best interest, and how their advertising monsters in the true spirit of "The Emperor's New Clothing" have made everyone believe that plastic lenses and digital pixels are worth their outrageously high price tags and capture better images than those old metal and glass gems of yesteryear.

    But, as you can plainly see, I am not venting. I just wanted to know how to get the dust off of one of my favorite lenses.

  7. #17
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,845
    My 2001 edition of Nikon Camera Repair Handbook by Thomas Tomosy (Amherst Media, Inc., P.O. Box 586, Buffalo NY 14226) has two pages on repairing the Nikkor-P Auto 105mm f/2.5 non-AI five element version.

  8. #18
    snegron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Hot, Muggy, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    805
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    That may be fungus, which is worse than dust, and will spread. Some people recommend killing the fungus by setting the lens in the sun so you get direct sunlight on the fungus.
    This was what I feared. The problem is that I live in Florida and it is very humid here. My air conditioner is on at all times, so the temperature is always at 75, humidity is the same as well. If I place the lens outside under direct sunlight, I wonder if the humidity would make the fungus grow more? Would I be able to achieve the same effect with an artificial UV light indoors?

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    This was what I feared. The problem is that I live in Florida and it is very humid here. My air conditioner is on at all times, so the temperature is always at 75, humidity is the same as well. If I place the lens outside under direct sunlight, I wonder if the humidity would make the fungus grow more? Would I be able to achieve the same effect with an artificial UV light indoors?
    You might want to read this:

    http://www.photoethnography.com/blog...g_cameras.html

    If the humidity level in the room where your stuff is stored is high, like over 60 percent or so, especially in the rainy season, you need to watch out.

    Also, clean your air conditioner's filter every once in a while.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,210
    I personally wound't worry too mucha bout dust, but fungus I would!

    You may have already seen this:

    http://www.nikonlinks.com/unklbil/repair_us.htm#fl

    I've used Nikon Authorized Service shops for my equipment and have always been quite pleased with the service. Last year I had a Nikkor 50/1.4 serviced (focus was getting dry sounding). It took a week and cost about $75 If I recall correctly. The lens was returned to "as new" operating condition.

    Hopefully one of these shops are in your general vacinity.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin