Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,711   Posts: 1,548,652   Online: 1140
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,778
    Images
    107
    I think it depends on the look you are after. Find a wood that when finished gives you the look you want. There are plenty of great hardwoods. I love walnut and my 8x20 is out of Walnut. I have had to use hand tools for most of the work and I love the way the wood works. The finish is a hand rubbed oil finish wet polished to 800 grit with diamond pads and then a protective satin wax. All hand rubbed. Yes I am a glutton for punishment. But so far so good. Good luck. I will post some pic's this weekend after some assembly.

    Jim

    Stay Focused....or Soft Focused!

  2. #12
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,059
    Images
    1
    Walnut. It is beautiful and has fairly optimal mechanical properties.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    994
    What Jim said. Provided it's stable, why limit yourself? I've used tiger-striped maple, curly cherry, mahogany and rosewood. (On separate cameras that is!) I've seen others use Padouk, purpleheart, lacewood...I'd stay away from lignum vitae and the oilier exotics because it's hard to find a glue that'll stick to them and they're usually astronomically expensive and heavy. But lignum vitae does make a great bearing surface for guide rails because it's almost self-lubricating, very soapy feeling. Of course there are environmental reasons as well to use no rainforest woods, but there are certified grower programs to help ease your conscience. I think curly cherry is a great compromise because it's very exotic looking, quite stable, relatively light and domestically grown.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    109
    Images
    1
    I guess i was just surprised at how much my ebony moved from moisture and i was worried about choosing a wood that was more tempermental. I also would like a harder wood so that it is more durable.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    421
    All wood moves. That is why you must build out of quarter sawn wood. It will shrink and expand but not warp. The hardest wood is Lignum Vitae. Very dense and will sink in water. Good for mallets but to heavy for cameras. Like Ebony it would be good for a bearing surface. Oak has an open grain that can cause some tearout. I've made some lens boards out of Zebrawood and it is quite distinctive. I think you should pick a color or shade and then go from there. Light, Birds eye Maple. Medium, Cherry. Dark, Walnut, Mahogany. Very dark, Ebony, Rosewood, Coco-Bola.

    The standards are Maple (painted) Cherry and Mahogany. These woods are, strong, stable, easy to work and light for their strength.

  6. #16
    barryjyoung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Near Seattle WA, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    411
    Images
    2
    I would recommend straight grained quartersawn Cherry. It is exceedingly dimensionally stable, it does not threaten rain forests, it is lightweight and beautiful. Mahogany second. I no longer use mahogany because I want my grandchildren to have a rain forest. Mahogaby is also much heavier.
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    VT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    576
    Images
    1
    I built a 3.25 x 4.25 reducing back for my 810 from cherry. Has remained quite stable, even here in VT where the weather goes from very dry to very wet every year.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    ky
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    25
    Has anyone used Paulownia -in any camera building or wood working applications?
    check this description http://www.paulowniasupply.com/paulo...cteristics.htm

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    ky
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    25
    as a disclaimer -I have nothing to do with this site or product -but found it using a quick search for paulownia characteristics -but for yrs I've heard about the dimensional stability of paulownia -esp. for boxes etc.
    barry

  10. #20
    Sparky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,100
    I'd vote for Jelutong. A bit more expensive than some - but for a camera project - not very. Very dimensionally stable, and it machines like the DICKENS and has zero grain.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin