Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,548   Posts: 1,544,547   Online: 978
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lobsta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    566

    Stripping Old Leather Covering

    I thought this had been covered somewhere, but I can't find anything specific after searching. I have an old Conley 6 1/2 x 8 1/2 self-casing camera which, except for needing a new bellows is sound. It's leather covered and the old leather is crumbling off. Since I want to use the camera, I wouldn't mind just leaving the old leather covering on it. But it's crumbly and leaves behind a trail of dust and old leather bits everytime the camera is picked up. What can I use to remove that old leather covering without destroying the wood below? What sort of adhesives were used a hundred years ago? Has anyone tried Citrus-Strip paint stripper?

    The wood appears to be mahogany. While I don't want to get into a full-blown restoration, I would like to get the camera cleaned up, put a new bellows on it and go take photographs with it.

    Thanks in advance,
    Will

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Dear Will,

    Rabbit glue (a relatively low-tack water-soluble collagen/gelatine glue) was a common way of sticking leather on, I am told. But I don't know how good the information is and the person who told me is dead...

    Cheers,

    R.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lobsta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    566
    Wabbit gwoo, eh? That would expwain why it's so wascally!

    Looking at the camera again, it appears that some careful and diligent work with a scraper (cabinet scraper or such) should work. Then perhaps lightly wipe the wood with acetone to get wid of the wabbit wesidue.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by wfwhitaker View Post
    Wabbit gwoo, eh? That would expwain why it's so wascally!

    Looking at the camera again, it appears that some careful and diligent work with a scraper (cabinet scraper or such) should work. Then perhaps lightly wipe the wood with acetone to get wid of the wabbit wesidue.
    Vater might vork better; I'd be supwised if wabblit was sowuble in acetone. Add a little vashing up liqvid.

    But this is only hearsay...

    Cheers,

    R. (or perhaps W)

  5. #5
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,287
    Images
    26
    Rabbit-skin glue is not soluable in acetone. It is, as Roger has suggested, water soluable. Chip and scrape away most of it and use a damp cloth, repeatedly wiping with a fresh surface. The final scrape can be done with a piece of glass, freshly cut and snapped (old woodworkers trick) or, less risky, the cabinet scraper you mention. There are shaped scrapers available for tight places.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lobsta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    ...But this is only hearsay...
    Or perhaps, haresay.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lobsta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    Rabbit-skin glue is not soluable in acetone. It is, as Roger has suggested, water soluable...
    Thanks Whitey. I'll stay away from the acetone. Good to know that water is the best wabbit wemover.

  8. #8
    wclavey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    253
    Images
    31
    I just stripped the crumbling leather off of a Crown Graphic and I can attest to the "scrape off what you can then use warm water" approach... it worked like a charm. It took, in total, about 45 minutes to do the whole thing, start to finish.

    scwewy wabbit...

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,405
    Images
    89
    A bit of heat would help as well, a hair dryer would probably do the trick, or else a hot air gun if you need more serious heat.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    A bit of heat would help as well, a hair dryer would probably do the trick, or else a hot air gun if you need more serious heat.
    Not sure about that; I'd back the damp cloth/broken glass approach above heat, and I'd be extremely hesitant about using a hot air gun. Wabbit glue dries VERY fast.

    Cheers,

    R.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin