Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 74,457   Posts: 1,643,763   Online: 737
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 36 of 36
  1. #31

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    236
    or coconut?

  2. #32
    johnnywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,256
    Images
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by colivet View Post
    What do you think of Koa?
    I don't have any personal experience with it, but according to my literature it's valued for musical instruments because of its resonance properties, but is medium to coarse textured and moderately difficult to glue. The veneer is valued because of its fiddleback figure. It's difficult to saw because of its interlocking grain, and your tools have to be sharp to prevent tearouts. It has excellent stability, and is relatively easy to plane. It takes varnish and stain well, and polishes well. Weight, density, bending strength and compression strength are high. Nailing and screwing properties are generally good.

    This may be more than you wanted to know!
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    24
    colivet,
    Spent 3 years in Hawaii ,where Koa is grown. It is some tuff stuff. Very difficult to work with hand tools and no that easy with powertools. Definately need to be sharp. It is also not that light, but it can be very beautiful when done.
    uncle jim

  4. #34

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    236
    Yes I actually am very familiar with Koa and do live in Hawaii full time. I am also a carpenter and had to install koa doors and a Koa bar top. I was mostly asking what you guys thought of the wood on terms of beauty. I have seen some pretty boring pieces of koa and I have also seen some amazing ones that shimmer in the light with golden color. Sometimes it can ha tones of red, green, brown, golden brown all in the same board.
    Yes it is not easy to work with even with sharp tools. It is brittle and a blow of a mallet with a sharp japanese chisel can make the board chip or the chisel too.
    Check some small pieces http://cgi.ebay.com/5-PREMIUM-HAWAII...QQcmdZViewItem

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,724
    Images
    96
    I've seen some wonderful Koa and would like to try working with it sometime.

    That there are boring pieces and amazing ones could be said for most any woods, and a lot of silver haloid too for that matter.

    At least in photography, we don't have to judge grain and figure before making a print, and for most of us, it's not different in every sheet.

  6. #36
    barryjyoung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Near Seattle WA, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    411
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by bliorg View Post
    There are (or at least have been) issues with cherry harvesting in the northeast. Large swaths of formerly bountiful cherry forests in Appalachia have been shut down (according to my two sawyers, anyway). Ain't gonna last forever - either the "Genuine" mahogany (which is sustainable, and not Cuban, FWIW) for it's ease in joinery, or cherry for its beauty would be my choices. Or some quartered walnut. Or Sapele. Or some bubinga.

    Too many choices.
    This is why I suggest people buy and why I buy only certified wood from guaranteed sustainable plantations.

    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin