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  1. #1

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    Any experience with Microlux table saw?

    I'm considering purchasing this small table saw (sold in the US by Micro-Mark) for my "Let's build a 7x17 camera" project. Does anyone have any experience with this model, positive or negative? I know the small size would be limiting relative to something I could buy at Lowe's or Home Depot, but I believe it would meet my needs as I don't see serious carpentry or cabinet-making in my future. This unit is also attractive since I'm rather space-limited, and it'll be easier to hide from the wife.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Isn't a precise wooden camera by definition serious wood working? Unless HD in the US sells higher quality stuff in it's shops then they do in Canada I'm not even sure the machines you see in Home Depot are that fine.

    I'm not saying it's not going to work but a lot of these machines are aimed at carpentry. Modern carpentry isn't exactly a wooden camera. How many perfectly square walls are being built these days?

  3. #3

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    Point taken. I guess what I was trying to say was that I don't anticipate the need to rip 4x8 sheets of plywood into little strips, so a smaller table saw aimed at the model-making community might be adequate, and I'm trying to validate that assumption before laying out the $$$.

  4. #4
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I have one at work and it is great for small pieces of wood or styrene. It would not be adequate for ripping 3/4 inch hardwood, though. It is really a fun thing to use, but it really is not adequate for what you will need.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fisher View Post
    I have one at work and it is great for small pieces of wood or styrene. It would not be adequate for ripping 3/4 inch hardwood, though. It is really a fun thing to use, but it really is not adequate for what you will need.
    Yes I have to agree with you, it doesn't have a big old 3/4 horse GE motor. But the accuracy is due to the table saw fence! A good fence will give you the repeatable cuts.

    The wood you will be buying will be 15/16 inch thick from a vendor like "CrossCut Hardwoods" and you will need a good saw blade, not the 32 tooth cheapie but a 60 tooth or greater finishing cut carbide saw blade and that is not cheap, my wife always asks me why I need the $70.00 saw blade, it saves time, ie: much less sanding. Even with my old 3/4 horse motor I've had to wait for the motor to cool down the thermo protection and yes that old motor pops the 20 amp fuses with out a problem if the saw gets binded up in the hardwood.
    It's not the camera......

  6. #6

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    Taunton press has published tests of 10 inch job site saws with numbers for blade run out, and actual performance. I don't remember if was in Fine Woodworking or Fine Home Building though.
    Freygr makes a good point that the blade and how well the saw is tuned matters more for its accuracy than the market it's sold in.

    FWIW, construction doesn't have to be sloppy or inaccurate. Recently I was doing some volunteer work framing walls at a facility owned by a major timber frame builder. Their walls are accurate to 1/16 inch.

  7. #7

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    Looks like a neat little saw for light duty (thinner woods)
    http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares...oduct&ID=80463

  8. #8
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    I would highly recommend a Dremel table saw. It has far less of the limitations the MicroMark has. It is easy to find blades, it has lots of power and it is about the same footprint.

    I used one for many years repairing and building cameras, they are excellent saws with a tilting arbor.

    Look on ebay or craigslist.
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by barryjyoung View Post
    I would highly recommend a Dremel table saw. It has far less of the limitations the MicroMark has. It is easy to find blades, it has lots of power and it is about the same footprint.

    I used one for many years repairing and building cameras, they are excellent saws with a tilting arbor.

    Look on ebay or craigslist.
    Barry,
    They're not available new any longer & I've been looking for a replacement. Dremel doesn't support It & gave me a 1/4" X 10 1/2" size. Projector recorder belt corp didn't have it. Do you have any suggestions?
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  10. #10
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    one more thing....

    If you do get a "standard" table saw, spend the time to properly tune it to get the fence parallel to the blade. I had to actually remachine the casting on my table saw (Taiwanese Powermatic) to get it tuned properly, but now it works perfectly. The other item to consider is the blade. The best I've seen is the Forrest blade....it is not cheap, but it is the best. I'd take a cheap, well tuned saw with a good blade ahead of a good, poorly tuned saw with the stock blade any time.

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