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  1. #1

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    How to fix Bellows Sag?

    I have nothing to do with this auction but it made me think.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Empire-State-8x1...QQcmdZViewItem

    Incase the link does not work here is the item number.
    250244412273

    What are the best practices to correct this.

    Thanks

    Gary
    "He who expecteth nothing,
    Shall not be disappointed." Robert Willingham, 1907

  2. #2
    phaedrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary892 View Post
    What are the best practices to correct this.
    Gary
    A bent piece of wire?

  3. #3
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    I've seen people mention putting a match-box or similar under the bellows to prop them up, rather than using something on top to hold 'em up. Seemed a slightly left-field solution that appealed to me... A tag with a hole in it attached to the top of a centre fold with a thin rod through it from back to front seems a popular solution.

    Cheers, Bob.
    Last edited by Bob F.; 05-04-2008 at 11:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I like using cords with loops or ribbons with metal rings on the bellows that compress the excess bellows toward the front standard.

    With my Sinar, the bellows is square and easily removed, so I just rotate it when it's sagging too much.

    Another method I've used is to support the bellows with something like a box or a sponge.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #5

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    All good Ideas

    For some strange reason I like the idea of supporting the bellows from underneath versus holding it up by a tab on the top with a rod for one end to the other.

    The sponge suggestion seems to me to be very reasonable. One can compact it so it fits in a camera bag and when in use it won't scratch the camera finish, if it is a soft sponge.

    Thanks for all the ideas.

    Gary
    "He who expecteth nothing,
    Shall not be disappointed." Robert Willingham, 1907

  6. #6
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary892 View Post
    For some strange reason I like the idea of supporting the bellows from underneath ...

    Gary
    Plaubel made a gadget for their monorail cameras,
    that clamped to the rail, and could be set just-so,
    to support the bellows. Works very nicely.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails plaubel.jpg  

  7. #7

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    On my 8x10 I prop up the bellows with the light meter. After figuring the exposure of course.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #8

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    Put part of the dark cloth under them. Put the carpenters level you use under them. Hire an assistant to hold them up?

  9. #9
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    My hat (base-ball cap style, or on cold days my wool cap) underneath, since wearing it under the dark cloth is a hassle anyway. I actually use first the method David mentioned, except for when I have the bellows stretched out too far to use it.

    I was having the opposite trouble -- the bellows blocking the light when very compressed - a clothes pin on the top of the bellows which kept the bellows from sucking into the back of the camera worked nicely.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.



 

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