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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    That's a rim-set Compur. The dial-set compur is an entirely different beast, both inside and out:
    This is how the thread started:

    "So I got this excellent looking early rim-set Compur with a clean 4,5/13,5 Tessar"

    SOmewhere I have some info on dial set compurs. I've poked around inside a couple of #2 dial set units. I have a rim set #1 which is slow and I was going to have a try at cleaning it up myself using this guidance but ahven't gotten to it yet.

    Dan

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Ole as usual is a mine of information.

    I have a 1919 16.5 cm Tessar in an early Dial set Compur and that does have metal shutter & iris blades. It's strange that they'd use an inferior material.

    Was there a shortage of the metal needed for blades at some stage ?

    Ian

  3. #13
    Ole
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    My ooops.

    Since "old dial-set Compurs and Compunds" were mentioned, my brain switched gears. Or perhaps the slow escapement didn't catch, which is what sometimes happens with over-lubed dial-set Compurs...

    The paper blades may indeed be a WWII shortage kind of thing - anyone have any other good reason for lack of thin spring steel?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #14
    JPD
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    Yes it's a rim-set Compur. The early type with the locking screw for the cover hidden under the aperture scale.

    Fotoguy20d, thanks for the link, but I have already been there.

    Grrr, no matter how much I try, it looks good but something feels stuck, or the shutter stays open, or all the speeds are the same, or...

    Not sure why they used paper. Maybe because matte black paper scatters less light than blued steel?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails brokencompur.jpg  

  5. #15
    Ole
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    One more thing:

    There are very many different versions of rimset Compurs, at least one of which must NOT be cocked without being fully assembled. There's a little spring that goes sproing if you do that, and only a very good repair person (i.e. Carol at Flutot's or Adam at SKGrimes) will be able to fit it back together. It took me six hours to give up...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    The paper blades may indeed be a WWII shortage kind of thing - anyone have any other good reason for lack of thin spring steel?
    No war in 1928, and it was a couple of years after the inflation. I also have a Gauthier Ibsor with paper iris. Maybe we could ask Friedrich Deckel if he remember?

    Oh, wait...

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    The paper blades may indeed be a WWII shortage kind of thing - anyone have any other good reason for lack of thin spring steel?
    Except this is a 1928 Compur, or is it ? The lens maybe a 1928 Tessar in an newer shutter ? Compur shutters have serial numbers too.

    Aren't springs, shutters & aperture blades made from a type of Gun-metal ?

    Ian

  8. #18
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    One more thing:

    There are very many different versions of rimset Compurs, at least one of which must NOT be cocked without being fully assembled. There's a little spring that goes sproing if you do that, and only a very good repair person (i.e. Carol at Flutot's or Adam at SKGrimes) will be able to fit it back together. It took me six hours to give up...
    I worked on it all night, until it looked like a fuzzy ball of grey cotton. My eyes are still tired.

    I don't know. Maybe I'll leave it as it is, or ask someone to fix it for a couple of 120 rolls of APX 25. If I'm lucky I will win on Lotto and be able to pay for a repair.

    I'm waiting for an Eurynar (dialyt) in a dial-set Compur. Bought it as-is, so I'm holding my thumbs that the shutter works. Dial-set Compurs are easier to work on, though.

  9. #19

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    I remember a sign I once saw in a clock repair shop.

    It read:
    Clock Repair
    $10
    $100, if you watch
    $1000, if you tried repairing it yourself.

    I hope you hit the Lotto - you might need lots of money!
    Good luck.

  10. #20
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPD View Post
    ... I'm waiting for an Eurynar (dialyt) in a dial-set Compur. Bought it as-is, so I'm holding my thumbs that the shutter works. Dial-set Compurs are easier to work on, though.
    Rodenstock came late to the standardisation of shutter sizes. The only lens I've found which fits into the (dial-set) shutter of a damaged 13,5cm Eurynar is another 13,5cm Eurynar!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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