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  1. #111

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    Jon, I think your supposition about #4 Panorams being shelf queens is probably quite correct. Specialty house film to fit them is very costly, and using them as single shot cameras with sheet film or making "roll your own" out of aerial film are both a big pain in the butt. So, I suspect folks, like me, who want to take pictures will settle for the #1 Panoram (even though it has only a 112 degree swing rather than the 142 degrees of the #4)

    On the other hand, in order to take advantage of the greater swing of the #4, some folks have made 2 1/4 masks plus some insert plugs to center the 120 film roll to line up with the mask in order to easily use the #4 to take 2 1/4 x 10 1/2 negatives for a 4 to 1 + panoramic ratio.

    By the way folks, those German 1.6 x 8 mm oval head brass screws are really nice, and that 0.1mm extra thread diameter compared to our old #0 x 5/16 screws actually helps them to fit a bit tighter in the old worn screw holes.

    This thread has been quiet of late, so I'm glad to see you join the discussion, Jon.

    I took my two #1 original models out for some test shots with both B&W and color film, shooting a roll of each type in each camera . . . it is at the lab now. More when I get the prints back.

    EuGene

  2. #112

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    The #4 Becomes a Shelf Queen

    I was tightening the loose arm on the bottom of the timing shaft when the screw gave way. It turns out that the black shaft is nothing more than soft brass; I overtightened and stripped the thread. I would have to re-machine a new shaft to replace it. What a shame, this was one pretty #4. It is now available for parts if anyone wants it. Send me an email.

    The other thing I learned is why the shutter is faster going in one direction than the other. It is because the arm on the bottom of the timing shaft (that presses down the spring inside) is not centered square between the springs in the neutral position; it is off to one side. As a result, when you set the shutter to one side it will press down more than if you set it to the other side.

    BTW: Centering the shaft and tightening the screw on the bottom does not work!
    "There are two ways to avoid most trouble in life: live below your means... and within your seams."

  3. #113

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    PM and email sent.

    Cheers,
    Clarence

  4. #114

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    Man, that's a bummer, Frank. I have had similar occurances when I was working on a camera . . . just about get the repairs all done, then have something break as I am putting everything back together.

    EuGene

  5. #115

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    I have been having a problem with flare coming from the film edges and really messing up my negatives when I use Iso 100 or 200 film. I have checked the various corners, joints, and doors for light leaks and it appears to be coming from the rear (backing paper side) rather than the front (emulsion side), hence the "leaking" onto the film from the edges. I suppose when these cameras were made, they were using 25 or 50 speed film and it wasn't such a problem.

    One thing that might help is to replace the faded orange-ish film window with a darker red one, as the window is doubtless a significant light source. I might put a foam and/or black velvet "donut" around the window on the inside of the camera, making it thick enough to brush against the film just enough to keep the interior of the camera from filling up with light.

    I would like to hear from others who have had this flare problem and how they have dealt with it.

    By the way, I have some No. 2 Brownie box cameras that have the same problem, again with light getting onto the film from the edges, suggesting that the light is leaking from the rear of the camera, with the red/orange window being the usual suspect.

    EuGene

  6. #116

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    Much of the film at the time was orthochromatic, and pretty slow as well. I've always plugged the window unless I'm in need of looking through it. Graflex used a spring door on their bag mags that let you look through the window to check the number but kept the window covered otherwise. How is the shooting going?
    Jamie

  7. #117

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    Well, Jamie, I shot a couple rolls through my two original Panorams and both had terrible flare comming in from the sides of the negative and bleeding toward the center. On some of the prints as much as 1/3 of the print was completely washed out.

    That's why I thought a foam or velvet "donut" around the window on the inside of the back would keep the light from scattering around the inside of the camera. I don't think it would be a problem if any light entering through the window was kept solely on the film backing paper by the "donut". I'm going to try it on one of my No. 2 Brownies (which also has a light leak at the red window) to see if that donut will cure the problem.

    EuGene

  8. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Jdude View Post
    Well, Jamie, I shot a couple rolls through my two original Panorams and both had terrible flare comming in from the sides of the negative and bleeding toward the center. On some of the prints as much as 1/3 of the print was completely washed out.

    That's why I thought a foam or velvet "donut" around the window on the inside of the back would keep the light from scattering around the inside of the camera. I don't think it would be a problem if any light entering through the window was kept solely on the film backing paper by the "donut". I'm going to try it on one of my No. 2 Brownies (which also has a light leak at the red window) to see if that donut will cure the problem.

    EuGene
    I found that using a small piece of black gaffer's tape to cover the window has helped with the flare on my Brownie Target Six-20. I also have a Kodak #3A Folding Brownie, and covering the red window with tape has helped there, too.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  9. #119

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    Yeah, Michael, I think I'll just go with the gaffer's tape. I tried the foam "donut" gambit, and it just gripped the paper backing . . . the result was that the foam rolled up like a carpet roll and was stuck off in the back corner beside the red window. I don't figure it will work with the Panorams either, so I will forget that idea.

    EuGene

  10. #120

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    info on the Kodak Panoram 3A

    Hello, all. I don't mean to hijack this thread but I just found this after having posted in Equipment > Panoramic Cameras and Accessories (link to that thread). I have just received two Kodak Panoram 3A's and am looking for advice on assessing their value and finding someone who might be interested in them.

    To save you effort, I'll paste in some relevant details from that thread:

    - The first 3A is in excellent condition, the case is light-tight, the "bellows" (not quite the right term for this camera design but whatever) is also light-tight, the shutter mechanism works fine at both speeds. The film rollers and uptake are all in working order. The only defect as far as I can see is that a piece of the viewfinder has broken off. That piece is with the camera and someone skilled could reattach it I guess.

    - The second 3A is disassembled. The pieces could be used to assemble a complete working model or used as repair parts for the first. The case and "bellows" are still light-tight as far as I can tell. In addition, there is an extra, i.e. 3rd, lens assembly that must have been part of another 3A at some point.

    - Each 3A has its own case and both are in good, working, but not excellent, condition. Main issue is that one or two of the folds in the leather are starting to split.

    If anyone can recommend a site or forum where people who are into collecting these hang out, I'd appreciate it. I'd like to get some value out of them but I'd also like to know they're in a good home being put to good use. And of course, if it would help to post more details or a picture or two, please let me know.

    Thanks,
    Dave



 

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