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  1. #11

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    I had Ken repair my No.1 Panoram Kodak and I couldn't be happier with the results. He did great work. Replaced the bellows, got the swing mechanism to work reliably, cleaned the lens and shimmed the film plane so that the lens was actually focusing where it was supposed to. It wasn't exactly a cheap repair bill, but then again how many people out there are repairing 100 year swinging lens panoramic cameras. I have one of the 'specials' with the Goerz lenses. Got it for a song on Ebay, then sunk about $300 into getting it fixed. I figure a total investment of less than $500 for a 6x17cm camera that you can used hand held is a great deal.

    Here are some of my Panoram shots. The negatives are actually sharper than these scans but I haven't worked out the best film holder for my scanner that will fit the long strips of film.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/summicr...7604099255323/

    Karl

  2. #12

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    Apr 2008
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    Clinton, AR
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    Karl:

    Actually, Ken has my older No. 1 Panoram at this time, but I normally can't afford to have others work on my cameras except on rare occasions . . . I'm just a guy working for the county doing admin & paperwork for the recycling center which isn't a high paying job. That's why I feel the need to learn how to maintain my Panorams. As it is, I haven't a clue what type of money I have committed myself to pay, but $300 scares the Hell out of me!

    Dang it, I really need to learn how to get the mechanism out of these Panorams to work on them myself. Certainly they can't be any more difficult to rebuild than LF shutters, like Compurs, Copals, etc., and I maintain all my LF gear myself. Just looking at the patent drawings, the Panoram mechanism appears very simple, but those drawings don't show how to get it out of the camera without disassembling the wooden body.

    EuGene

  3. #13

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    Apr 2008
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    Karl:

    By the way, nice prints there! My old Panoram (that I had to sell in 1995 to pay a divorce lawyer) also took nice shots . . . my favorite was the Vietnam Veterans' Wall in DC. I got a couple of great shots of it before the Park Rangers ran me off of the grass out in front of the Wall.

    EuGene

  4. #14

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    wow karl

    those are some nice pictures!
    i have always liked panorams,
    but was always shy on buying one ...

    it looks like ken's repairs were well worth it!

    john

  5. #15

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    Apr 2008
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    John:

    If you can scarf up the shekels, by all means buy a Panoram! Like Karl said, they are a great deal for a 6x17 camera. Even with the meniscus lens, they take real nice pictures. The early models (no letter designation, but prior to #1-B model) came stock with a RR lens that was even better. Of course, the cat's meow is the special order ones like Karl's with the Goerz glass.

    EuGene

  6. #16

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    Thanks. It's a fun camera. You do tend to go through film in a hurry with only 4 shots per roll. I picked up a 50 roll box of expired Ilford PanF to get to know the camera.

  7. #17

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    Well, hopefully the learning curve is not a long drawn-out affair. Maybe you can meter various light conditions and test both speed settings, then on down the line you just meter a scene and know which setting is best for it. Of course, a calibrated eyeball might be just as good as any ole fancy meter.
    Last edited by B&Jdude; 09-08-2008 at 11:39 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Can't write my name with out spelling errors!

  8. #18

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    Jan 2003
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    Well, since you only have a choice of 1/50th or 1/100 of a second and shooting a full aperture (6.8 in my case), slow film is the way to go.

  9. #19

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    Yeah, with the Panoram that I had back in the 1990's, I used ASA 50 on bright days and 100 or 200 on overcast days. I just had to reckon it out for myself as to which film to use on "in-between" days. But, at least I had 2 speeds so I could bracket a little bit.

    Now that I am back in the Panoram saddle again, I will have to relearn some of the techniques which I used as well as the characteristics of the specific camera(s) that I will be using. I think the slow speed B&W has pretty broad exposure range and is most forgiving of cameras with crude speed control. Actually I had good luck with color film too, except that it seemed that the slowest that I had was 200 speed, so I only used it on not so bright days. I suppose I could have made a small slip-on ND filter that I could put on the lens when it was too bright, but I never tried that.

  10. #20

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    I've thought about a sort of pinhole slip on lens cap in order to get some more depth of field. It would be nice to have something that works as an smaller aperture.

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