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  1. #1
    schrochem's Avatar
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    Installing the tripod bushing

    I 'finally' have my Ries A250 on the way.
    It only took 3 months of waiting to get it, but it will be worth it.
    My Korona had a plate screw onto the base that had a quickplate attached to that.
    I removed the plate and the original bushing is pretty much gone and the hole is all torn up.
    I saw some nice 3/8" bushing at Lowe's that should work. They are the type that screw in. It's 7/8" long which is the width of the bed. The girth should be wider than the current hole so it will have enough bite.
    My question is how does the bushing stay put?
    The hole in the base goes all the way through.
    I was thinking of dabbing the exterior threads of the bushing in Liquid Nails before screwing it in.
    Any suggestions? I might only have one shot at it and don't want to screw it up. I am rebuilding a new base for the beast, but it's going slow......
    Thanks
    Scott
    Scott

  2. #2
    jmcd's Avatar
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    Personally, I would look for a tripod bush that mounts through the top of the bottom plate, with a large diameter nail-head type top, and a smaller threaded cylinder, the type used on Wisner and Ansco cameras. This way you are relying on more than threads in wood. These usually have three holes around the diameter of the top for small screws to hold it in place.

    If you are installing the screw-in type insert snug but not too tight, the threads should hold tight enough on their own, but a dab of glue (polyurethane or epoxy would bond to metal and wood) would not hurt. It is important to get the pilot hole exactly plumb, and to screw in the threaded insert mounted on a threaded rod backed up by two locking nuts. Spinning this set-up by hand mounted in a drill press while threading it into your wood will help it go in true. It would be very instructive to practice on some scrap of similarly dense wood.

  3. #3
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmcd View Post
    Personally, I would look for a tripod bush that mounts through the top of the bottom plate, with a large diameter nail-head type top, and a smaller threaded cylinder, the type used on Wisner and Ansco cameras. This way you are relying on more than threads in wood. These usually have three holes around the diameter of the top for small screws to hold it in place.
    In the US, this is commonly referred to as a T-nut. There are two types. One has nail holes through the flange and the other has metal "prongs" turned down off the edges to keep the T-nut from spinning.

    http://www.woodpeck.com/media/main_tnut.jpg
    http://www.allproducts.com/metal/eye...se_t_nut-s.jpg

    The T-nut should be installed so that the flange is on the top surface of the camera bottom plate. You can find T-nuts with shorter or longer threaded sections.

    Lee

  4. #4
    schrochem's Avatar
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    Thanks I really like that approach better.
    Do any local stores sell these things?
    I found they are popular for climbing walls. Rei sells some of the pronged ones.
    I think the screw in type would be better and maybe easier on the old wood.
    I'll stop in Lowes tomorrow and see what they have.
    Thanks
    again
    Scott

  5. #5

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    McMaster-Carr has the tee nuts. I got 100 for about 13 plus shipping.
    It's not the camera......

  6. #6
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Scott, you can find them at Lowes. Look in the drawers in the nuts and bolts section. They should be there. Make sure you get your hole drilled just right. I know that when I was building my 11x14 I put two holes in the bottom for this. I wanted the extra support. You may even want to use a small rectangular piece of brass to put down first to expand the area of these T nuts. I used some thin brass that I drilled two holes into and lined them up with the holes in the camera bed and screwed and epoxied the T nuts in. I even drilled some extra small holes in the T nut for extra support. It looks good and it is rock solid. It you need some pictures let me know.

    Jim

  7. #7
    schrochem's Avatar
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    Thanks for the added explanation.
    I bought the 3/8" t-adapter at lowes but it's only 7/16" long.
    Looking around online, McMaster, Grainger, etc. that seems to be standard and I can't find one that is longer (the base is 7/8" thick).
    So, I might go with that screw in one after all. Maybe I can find a screw with a flange and attach that to the top of the screw.....
    Scott

  8. #8
    Lee L's Avatar
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    You may not want to do this with your camera, but at least with new construction you'd probably just counter bore a wider hole to accommodate the flange of the T-nut.

    The threaded inserts you mentioned earlier would be another option.

    Lee

  9. #9
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Scott, you can use a Forstner bit to drill a hole and recess it into the base. I would go with the T nut and screw it in. Maybe even some epoxy to be sure. It will be easier than trying to screw a threaded insert into hardwood. Trust me on this one. I learned from experience. You can recess the T nut with the Forstner bit so that the nut is lower than the base. The bit will leave the mark to drill the hole through the base. Screws and epoxy and you are done. Make sure to pre-drill the holes. Just make sure the 3/8" bolt goes into the T nut as far as it can.

    Jim

  10. #10
    schrochem's Avatar
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    Thanks for the recess tip. Are y'all suggesting I still do that from the top?
    Or would the bottom be fine?
    Thanks again
    Scott

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