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View Poll Results: What wood would you choose for your next camera?

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  • Walnut

    6 8.45%
  • Cherry

    27 38.03%
  • Ebony

    6 8.45%
  • Mahogany

    17 23.94%
  • Rosewood

    5 7.04%
  • Cocobolo

    2 2.82%
  • Other (post it in a reply)

    8 11.27%
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  1. #21
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Balsa wood...and I am being quite serious.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #22
    Laurent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Balsa wood...and I am being quite serious.
    This is something I'd consider, in association with CF, for a very lightweight camera.
    Laurent

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    Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast (Oscar Wilde)

    My APUG Blog

  3. #23

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    Balsa is hardly light proof until you get way past 1/4 inch.

    Whatever wood you choose should be tested. Go to a dark room with a very bright flashlight (torch) and wait for your eyes to adjust. Then put the light behind the wood and shine it through, try to seal the light so that none can escape around the sides. If you see any sort of dim glow, the wood is not a good choice.

    I once though 1/16 thick aircraft grade plywood might be a good choice, I found after gluing two sheets together (now 6 ply and 1/8 thick) that it still let far too much light through. Took about 4 heavy coats of black paint on the inside and outside to finally block everything that I could see and not fog film when left in the sun for several hours. Lessen learned there.

  4. #24

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    If I am going to build a camera myself it would be some brazilian wood.
    Maybe in a couple of years or so.

    Peter

  5. #25
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_E View Post
    Balsa is hardly light proof until you get way past 1/4 inch.
    It does not need to be. That is what the bellows are for.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #26

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    For a kit-camera, I think Walnut may be the most forgiving in terms of expense, workability, sustainability, and finishing by the end-user.
    My $0.02.
    Tracy Storer
    Polaroid 20x24 Studio West
    www.mammothcamera.com

  7. #27
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    As an ex woodworker I'm missing Oak on the list, one of the most durable wood, its the best wood for many things.
    But for a camera maybe I would take Walnut or Ashwood.

    Cherrs Armin
    Good light and nice shadows!

    www.artfoto.ch

  8. #28
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnArs View Post
    As an ex woodworker I'm missing Oak on the list
    That's the one I wanted to see on the list too as my current camera is oak.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #29

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    European Pear

    One of the most stable woods in the world(if not the most). Absolutely stunning under many finishes, almost as light as mahogany, works like a dream with hand and machine tools. Used in the creation of musical instruments, especially Violin tail pieces, pegs, fingerboards (baroque), inlays, lute staves, bridges and guitar backs/sides. Bends easily and turns on a lathe, like butter. Makes the best jack slides in a harpsichord because of its stability. That's what I'd use.... made a guitar for the guitarist of the Metropolitan Opera with it, rosewood as the secondary wood. Don't know why camera's aren't made of Swiss or European Pear. On the expensive side, but less than rosewood and ebony.
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.

  10. #30

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    "Don't know why camera's aren't made of Swiss or European Pear. On the expensive side, but less than rosewood and ebony."

    Nice choice, I think Zone VI made a few in French pear, rather special.

    I have some marvelous Black Ash and lovely brown White Oak, now to find the time.

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