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View Poll Results: What wood would you choose for your next camera?

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  • Walnut

    6 8.45%
  • Cherry

    27 38.03%
  • Ebony

    6 8.45%
  • Mahogany

    17 23.94%
  • Rosewood

    5 7.04%
  • Cocobolo

    2 2.82%
  • Other (post it in a reply)

    8 11.27%
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  1. #1

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    Favorite wood for a wooden camera?

    If you had and could pick what wood your next camera would be made of, what would you choose?
    Sorin

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________
    Frugal Sorin Blog - Last article : light proof material (for darkroom, changing bag, focusing cloth,etc)

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Since I have Wood (cherry/mahogany) and Aluminum I'd think it would be cool to build a carbon fiber camera. There are not a lot of CF cameras out there, so having one as a kit would be unique. The CF can be cut to higher tolerances than wood, so for a kit, I would think it could make a very high quality and precision camera without a lot of sanding, filing, filling, finishing and gluing by the builder.

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I voted for mahogany as I have used that for various things in the past, such as guitars, and I like working with it. However, my current camera is going to be oak (as was the last one).

    I had a look through your blog and I see you cheat at making finger joints... just like I do! I have an Excellon CNC router/drill at work which was originally bought for printed circuit board manufacture.

    It seems to get used for all sorts of things now that I know how to use it. I call these items training pieces!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #4

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    CF can be hard to make light tight. Remember that it is fabric weave with clear epoxy, so the light may come right through depending on the construction.

    Also CF is dangerous to work without a good breathing filter, those tiny particles of carbon can really do some damage (ask a coal miner). It can also dull cutting tools very quickly. Mix graphite with the epoxy to help reduce the clear aspects of the binder. It is also extremely expensive in sheets check prices at http://www.onlinemetals.com

    Cherry or Walnut with a natural clear sealer would be nice. Maybe leave it in the sun for a couple of months to darken after sealing.

    Alternate would be a nice billet aluminum camera, maybe anodized to a color with minimal leather on the grip areas.

  5. #5
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Here is an example of what I was thinking. These racing model car kits are made of CF, aluminum and GRP. They are very strong and relatively light weight. This type of construction would make a very sturdy and durable kit. I suspect it could be more rugged than my aluminum Horseman, though, perhaps heavier.

  6. #6

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    I'm familiar with CF sheets like that.. They are super expensive when you try to buy a sheet of the material. Would be slightly cheaper to make a foam core and lay up sheets and resin then vacuum bag it. Would be really cool looking. You could then put black flocking inside to make sure it was light tight and no reflections. The foam core would probably need to be done as a lost foam technique where you melt the foam with solvent after the resin cures.

  7. #7
    sun of sand's Avatar
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    I'm not too picky about camera materials
    Don't care a single bit since I'm not building or having one built
    But
    why not bamboo?
    why isn't maple used more? Maybe its used a lot and I just don't know


    Of the choices given I'd choose rosewood. Something very distinctive with wild grain patterns Pollock styled or multiple woods
    with chrome

  8. #8
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sun of sand View Post
    I'm not too picky about camera materials
    Don't care a single bit since I'm not building or having one built
    But
    why not bamboo?
    why isn't maple used more? Maybe its used a lot and I just don't know


    Of the choices given I'd choose rosewood. Something very distinctive with wild grain patterns Pollock styled or multiple woods
    with chrome
    Walnut and Cherry are great to work with because they are easy on your tools and cut/shape easily. They are both light and strong, unlike some of the other exotic woods that are strong but not so light. Mahogany is another good wood. Dimensional stability is a really critical characteristic of a good camera wood and cherry has it in spades.

    Maple has a reputation of being a bit harder to work... especially the cool stuff like the birdseye maple.

    Some of the prettiest grain patterns are in the exotic woods and make a beautiful camera but not necessarily the best camera.

  9. #9
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sun of sand View Post
    why not bamboo?
    why isn't maple used more? Maybe its used a lot and I just don't know
    I have seen bamboo used to make an acoustic guitar: http://www.giles.com/yamaha1/pressre...PAC/bamboo.htm

    Maple (and its twin brother sycamore) is a very common guitar and violin material. No reason why it wouldn't work on a camera.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #10
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sun of sand View Post
    or multiple woods with chrome
    Chrome is the shiny electroplated metal choice of the devil!

    Nickel plate is what you want on a camera.



    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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