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  1. #1
    darinwc's Avatar
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    proper use of graphite for blades

    I have some sticky shutter blades in an Olympus Pen EED that just seem like they need to be hit with some graphite. The action just is not smooth.
    Is there a specific type of graphite to get and what is the best method to apply it?

    THX

  2. #2

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    Ummm, NONE!
    If the blades are icky don't make them sticky.
    They should be dry as should the housing.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #3
    darinwc's Avatar
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    My problem is that I have thouroughly dissasembled and cleaned the blades, but they still require more oomph that I think the little spring can put out reliably. The way this shutter is designed, they rub against the housing quite a bit and I would like to reduce that friction.

    so... do I need to 'spray' a little graphite between them and leave a little 'dust' there for it to work? -or do I have to rub it onto the blades and then blow the excess dust away?

  4. #4
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    I've not yet been faced with this, but some day...

    Anyway, found this, might be worth reading. Most still don't recommend graphite, but the rest of it might be useful. Keep us posted.

    http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...p/t-41440.html
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  5. #5
    darinwc's Avatar
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    OK heres the deal with graphite: It's messy stuff! The little tube it came in squirts irregular amounts and it gets all over.
    Use it in a separate work area than where you dissasembled your camera!

    What I ended up doing was squiting some into a plastic film container. I dipped the tip of a Q-tip into the stuff and then tapped it on the edge (like a cigarette) to remove the excess.

    With the shutter assembly -completely- dissasembled and removed each blade individually. I used the Q-tip to rub the graphite onto the surface of each side of each blade. It grayed the surface a little, kinda the shade of a pencil mark.
    I also hit the shutter housing in this case.

    After I was done, I blew away all the graphite dust, twice, before I reassembled the shutter mechanism.

    Did it work? I think so. The action is improved, but it was not a huge difference.
    I would not reccomend this for most shutters, but in the case of this olympus pen eed I was working on, the mechanism is very weak.

  6. #6

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    In the olden days, as a Linotype operator, we would polish the spacing tabs with graphite. This was done by taking the spacers and rubbing them on a board with graphite. I wonder if polishing the aperature blades this way, then wiping them clean would help remove the stickyness? Hopefully the wiping would remove any loose graphite.

  7. #7

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    I once new a camera repairman that put graphite and blades into a rotating tumbler used for polishing rocks.
    In that way the blades got covered with a thin layer of graphite, so it makes some sense.
    I did it a couple of times by rubbing the blades with Qtips and graphite.
    It might help, but be shure to use an even underground when you do it.

    Peter

  8. #8
    Philippe-Georges's Avatar
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    You do not have to believe me, but, a long time ago, in the Hasselblad factory, there was a kind of a rotating cylinder (like a concrete mill in miniature, a tumbler as Archphoto told?) with hard rice grains in (the one they eat in China) and the tiny parts got polished during a long time in it. I wonder if some kind of rice powder might do the job for you...

    Good luck,

    Philippe
    "...If you can not stand the rustle of the leafs, then do not go in to the woods..."
    (freely translated quote by Guido Gezelle)

    PS: English is only my third language, please do forgive me my sloppy grammar...

  9. #9

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    I like to take a small amount of rubbing alcohol, 70+% iso or similar (not acetone, lighter fluid has worked for me in a pinch too) and mix it with a small amount of graphite. You want an almost slightly runny paste.. I dab a q-tip in and gently swab the blades, let dry and fire it over and over again. Shake it out/etc. You don't want graphite floating around.

    YMMV.. it helped an older graphex shutter for a while but the real problem was the spring. Eventually all speeds faster than 1/30th or so fired at the same speed (like 1/30th), but all the slower speeds work fine. 1/1 is like 2/1.
    I still use it, amazingly.. the glass looks like someone (not me!) cleaned it with a brillo pad or took it to the beach. Ah well.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by leicam5 View Post
    You do not have to believe me, but, a long time ago, in the Hasselblad factory, there was a kind of a rotating cylinder (like a concrete mill in miniature, a tumbler as Archphoto told?) with hard rice grains in (the one they eat in China) and the tiny parts got polished during a long time in it. I wonder if some kind of rice powder might do the job for you...

    Good luck,

    Philippe
    interesting notion that rice might be of some help.
    sounds good to me!

    at the coffee shop i worked at, we sold burr grinders/coffee mills
    and it is recommended that one puts uncooked/raw white rice through
    the grinder to clean off the burrs -- if / when they get gummed up from
    oily coffee beans ..
    im empty, good luck

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