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  1. #11
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    The best solution for cleaning the fungus from lenses (that I've found) is a 50/50 mix of household ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. I will work in other areas too, I think best on the metal and leather body parts of the camera.

    Remove the lens if you can. I'm not sure I'd use this on a bellows but you might try wiping down the body and the body leather with it on a paint brush. Let it dry in the bright sun for a while. This has worked very well for me on the bellows (yes I used it) of a Super Ikonta as well as the body and lens. I then filled a old, clean sock with ground coffee, put all in a plastic bag and let is sit for a week. This seems to have worked for me quite well.

  2. #12
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    When you get around to re-gluing the leather, it was probably put on with a hide glue or shellac. Both can be removed later if you wish. To recover with leopard or zebra naugahide maybe?
    You can get shellac at auto parts stores as gasket sealer.
    I had no idea gasket sealer was shellac, will have to try this next. Thank you!

    I usually pour ordinary shellac in a small glass mason jar, to about 1 inch from the bottom and let it sit until the alcohol in it, evaporates, and it gets as thick as maple syrup.

    Remove all the leather if you can, usually by dampening the leather that is still attached with alcohol if you are very careful it will just peel off. Depending on the camera, water might do the same.

    If it was reattached during a repair with contact cement you will have trouble. Peel what you can back to the point you can get a sharp Exacto knife or scalpel under it, and work it off very very carefully.

    Clean the metal, that was under the leather well. I have had the luck of just dampening the old adhesive with with alcohol lots of times, but a few times I was faced with no alternative but really scraping the old adhesive off with a razor blade.

    Cover any rivets with a laquer, or finger nail polish and let dry well. Then paint the area to be recovered with the shellac (or the hide glue as was suggested). Let it dry for a few minutes then dampen the leather with the alcohol (or water, if hide glue) and carefully reattach.

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