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  1. #11

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    Fresh water is not a problem. Remove the focusing screen, lens, back n prism, dry whatever you can with a paper towel. If your oven has a pilot light in it (aprox 100°F)... Extend the bellows all the way out and put the camera (body, backs opened and prism (battery removed)) in there for a day or overnight till it dries out. Since the camera is mechanical there is nothing to harm aside from silt or dirt in the water it was immersed in. If all works, you're good to go. If not, it will need a CLA.

    The focusing screen is easy enough to take appart if it is one with a couple layers. Wash everything with filtered water and pat dry, don't wipe if it has a fresnel lens or you will imbed dirt in the lens.

    The prism may have a meter and may suffer damage from the fall not the water. Dry it out with the camera in the oven but remove the battery. Once it is dry try it out. If it;'s not working, well buy that hand held meter you've been eyeing for years.

    Now the lens... the filter can be removed by taking out the glass, then cutting the ring to twist it out of the front of the lens. Does the lens rim have damage as well? Can you see any water in the lens? Does it still fire?
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  2. #12

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    It was the standard finder so thankfully no meter. I was checking my hand held meter when this happened. There is water in the lens but the shutter still fires. The lens ring has no damage. There is silt in the camera in the area behind the light baffle.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I'd definitely have the lens CLA'd (moisture in the shutter and aperture) and would recommend the same for the body.

    Matt

  4. #14

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    Which lens is this? Where do you see the water?

    Slit behind the light baffle? What light baffle are you talking about?
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  5. #15

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    50mm 4.5 C with the floating element. The water appears to be on the rear element and another element within the lens. The silt is in the area that is behind the mirror in the body.

  6. #16
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    To free the filter, you might try pressing the filter into the sidewall on your automobile tire, then giving a good twist while the filter is pressed against the tire. I've freed many lenses and filter that way.

    I'd try rinsing the body with distilled water to see if the silt would come out.

    I'd check the price of a CLA on the lens against what another lens costs.
    juan

  7. #17

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    Taking the rear cell off will give tyou access to the inside surfaces. See if that gets to the water? The rear cell unscrews out like a light bulb. The front cell is a bit more complicated to remove.

    The silt behind the mirror can be dabbed out with a paper towel, a q-tip, split a sharp end on the q-tip wooden stick n pick it out, blow it out with come canned air.

    Hopefully none of the water n silt got inside through the mirror control slot. OPening up the camera would be the way to go then, mauybe a good thing since the internal seals on most RBs have never been changed since they were new.

    See how it all works after it's dried out, then decide if it needs to go into the shop or DIY.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  8. #18

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    I sent it into my local camera shop. Everything works fine. The roll for the most part is ok. However one of the better frames has backing paper stuck to it.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  9. #19
    mhcfires's Avatar
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    50mm 4.5 C with the floating element. The water appears to be on the rear element and another element within the lens. The silt is in the area that is behind the mirror in the body.

    Didn't float, huh? I dropped my Topcon RE Super into the drink and it went right to the bottom . I had it CLA'd and it was fine for the next 25 years. Glad there wasn't too much damage. Murphy's law insists that the best frames will be the ones most damaged.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  10. #20
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhcfires View Post
    Murphy's law insists that the best frames will be the ones most damaged.
    But then that will make them even better, they will transcend "best" and become legendary. Anyone can make a great photo (at least once in a while) but only a very few exceptional photos will actually have a story behind them.

    Show me an excellent photograph and I will nod politely and try not to yawn. Show me a photo which is poorly composed, out-of-focus, badly scratched and ragged around the edges but has a story behind it and you have my attention.
    Last edited by Bosaiya; 12-10-2009 at 01:33 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I'm on a roll

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