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  1. #11
    BradS's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the feedback guys...and sorry to aska question and not follow up sooner. I've been away for a bit.

    To answer some of the questions:

    The camera is a bone stock Kodak 2D (ca. 1948). I'm pretty sure it is is made of mahogany or Cherry. It appears to have the original dark finish.

    The finish isn't bad but is does have a few areas where the varnish (?) has worn away.

    All of the brass is nearly black with...tarnish?

    Oh, and the thing smelss bad! I never knew a camera could smell so bad!

    The bellows appear to be a newer replacement as they are in fine condition.

    I need to take it apart to repair the front focus gearing - and even that is not urgent. It is quite usable and shoots just fine as is.

  2. #12
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ulrich Drolshagen View Post
    All (or at least nearly all) these products contain silicone. It penetrates the varnish down to the wood. After an application you will not be able to get a new coating with varnish on unless you strip it completely including the first layer of wood. Thus I can not recommend it.

    Ulrich

    I really do not understand. If what you say were true of the product I mentioned, it would not even come close to doing what it claims and what others who have used it say it does. Perhaps, we are talking about two different things?

  3. #13

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    My opinion is that if everything is working fine, you should just use it as is and enjoy the process of making images. (I love wood and metal working, finishing is OK, refinishing sucks, shooting and printing are heaven)
    Tracy Storer
    Polaroid 20x24 Studio West
    www.mammothcamera.com

  4. #14
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1234 View Post
    Yeah... git 'er nekked and rub 'er down good!!
    Ha! That was good. Real good.

    But seriously, I've been thinking of stripping my 8x10 Burke&James down. It is that ugly battleship gray and I hear that under the hideous paint is a beautiful maple body. I'm just afraid that after I get all her clothes (bellows, brass... what have you) off and rub her down, I just won't be able to get her dressed again. That's what pictures are for.

    No, not what you are thinking. Seriously, take good pictures of all the bits before you take the camera apart. You can refer to the images in the event you are stuck putting your baby back together.

  5. #15

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    That's good advice and precisely what I would do. My failing memory often leads me to projects that are unfini

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchwinnParamount View Post
    Ha! That was good. Real good.

    But seriously, I've been thinking of stripping my 8x10 Burke&James down. It is that ugly battleship gray and I hear that under the hideous paint is a beautiful maple body...

    Ha! That's interesting...I have owned two of the grey Burke & James 5x7 Commercial View cameras....and really liked the grey paint with bright red bellows. After selling them, I realized I should have kept the one.

    I had big ideas. I let all the crap that I read on the internet infect my head...thought I needed a "better" camera...even though I made many nice photos with the old gray B&J . Turns out, I sold off the battle ships and some other stuff and bought a really nice 5x7 wood field (I'll not mention what brand) in amazing condition and never used it - it was just too pretty!

    In hindsight, I should have kept the B&J and tuned out all that crap on the WWW.

    Maybe, I should try to benefit from this lesson.

  7. #17
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    Some problems I'm having with a hideous old Vageeswari 10x12 is that the bottom is so dented that considerable sanding will be required. how then will the brass pieces fit back on properly? Chisel out the indents? Other wood is missing. What kind of wood filler is best to use? Then, how do you get the filled wood to match the older wood. You can't fill with teak. Will need to paint it with oil paints to match, then shellac? Here is another issue. When old screws are taken out, they do not go back in properly. Inside the hole they rust and corrode; there is no way to screw them in deeper, the wood is too hard, the screw is too dull from corrosion. Toothpicks don't allways work.
    I am reluctant to attempt a complete redo for the above reasons.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by studiocarter View Post
    Some problems I'm having with a hideous old Vageeswari 10x12 is that the bottom is so dented that considerable sanding will be required. how then will the brass pieces fit back on properly? Chisel out the indents? Other wood is missing. What kind of wood filler is best to use? Then, how do you get the filled wood to match the older wood. You can't fill with teak. Will need to paint it with oil paints to match, then shellac? Here is another issue. When old screws are taken out, they do not go back in properly. Inside the hole they rust and corrode; there is no way to screw them in deeper, the wood is too hard, the screw is too dull from corrosion. Toothpicks don't allways work.
    I am reluctant to attempt a complete redo for the above reasons.
    On the screws, if they are corroded you replace the screw, and it will hold like when it was new. I bet the screws were brass plated and a hardware store (not Ace(True value), Lowes or Home Depot - big box chains) will have them. There are several places on the web: http://www.microfasteners.com/, http://www.nutty.com/, http://www.mcmaster.com/, And a surprise source https://www.mscdirect.com/ These guys have any machine screw metric or English down to the larger sizes that microfasteners stocks.

    Missing wood you replace with the same type. Small pieces of wood you pay more in shipping that the wood costs. Now on a non-visable location use plastic wood to full and just paint the area after sanding the base flat (just the plastic wood).
    It's not the camera......

  9. #19
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by studiocarter View Post
    Some problems I'm having with a hideous old Vageeswari 10x12 is that the bottom is so dented that considerable sanding will be required. how then will the brass pieces fit back on properly? Chisel out the indents? Other wood is missing. What kind of wood filler is best to use? Then, how do you get the filled wood to match the older wood. You can't fill with teak. Will need to paint it with oil paints to match, then shellac? Here is another issue. When old screws are taken out, they do not go back in properly. Inside the hole they rust and corrode; there is no way to screw them in deeper, the wood is too hard, the screw is too dull from corrosion. Toothpicks don't allways work.
    I am reluctant to attempt a complete redo for the above reasons.
    If you have access to a drill press, then attach a drill bit with a SMALLER diameter than the screws you want to put in. Drill out the hole to the depth you want the screws in. Be sure to tape a small piece of masking tape to the drill bit at the depth (as measured from the end of the bit) that you want the hole. Then simply drill into the wood to the bottom edge of the tape on the bit. Presto! You have a new hole in the wood that you can insert your screw into. The diameter of the hole is less than the diameter of the screw threads so there is wood to bit the threads into. An added bonus is that you will not split the wood as you force the screws in to the depth you want.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by studiocarter View Post
    Some problems I'm having with a hideous old Vageeswari 10x12 is that the bottom is so dented that considerable sanding will be required.
    During my apprenticeship (some decades ago) I had to refurbish furniture occasionally. With some luck we were able to simply iron out dents with an iron and a damp cloth. Dents are compressed wood. With the damp cloth and a hot iron you can bring the wood to expand again. Do that before sanding, provided it is some kind of furniture varnish, not boat varnish and it is not simply painted.
    how then will the brass pieces fit back on properly? Chisel out the indents? Other wood is missing. What kind of wood filler is best to use? Then, how do you get the filled wood to match the older wood.
    Cabinet makers use shellac-sticks for small defects. They are made in different colors to match the color of the wood. Sometimes we applied a small amount of wood glue to the end grain of some piece of wood of matching color and scraped some wood with a chisel off. Thus making our own filler paste
    You can't fill with teak. Will need to paint it with oil paints to match, then shellac? Here is another issue. When old screws are taken out, they do not go back in properly. Inside the hole they rust and corrode; there is no way to screw them in deeper, the wood is too hard, the screw is too dull from corrosion. Toothpicks don't allways work.
    you can use epoxy applied with a syringe to fill the hole and screw in the screw before the hardenening.
    I am reluctant to attempt a complete redo for the above reasons.
    Ulrich

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