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  1. #1
    BradS's Avatar
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    How to disassemble a Kodak 2D????

    I have been working on a 1948-ish 8x10 Eastman Kodak View Camera Model 2-D. I have it mostly disassembled but cannot figure out how to separate the bellows housing - the rear box from the rear tilt pivot points. Do those things unscrew some how? or were tehy considered a destroy and replace type part?

    Also, how does one remove the rear swing lock? The threads are peened over to prevent the knob from falling off....do I grind/file off the peened over part? or...????

  2. #2
    Curt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    I have been working on a 1948-ish 8x10 Eastman Kodak View Camera Model 2-D. I have it mostly disassembled but cannot figure out how to separate the bellows housing - the rear box from the rear tilt pivot points. Do those things unscrew some how? or were tehy considered a destroy and replace type part?

    Also, how does one remove the rear swing lock? The threads are peened over to prevent the knob from falling off....do I grind/file off the peened over part? or...????
    I just finished the disassembly of one myself and the answer is yes just file the peened end of the threaded shaft down until the knob comes off. It's no problem to re-peen it later with a ball peen hammer, they do come in hand every once in a lifetime. I wondered why I had three different sizes and now I'll be using one.

    The rear pivots are either threaded screws with flat nuts, the head of which you can tell by the slot, or they are plain faced and are a rivet with the inside peened over a flat washer. You will have to file there too to remove the rivet. What I'm going to do is drill into the rivet shaft, drill it and thread it with a flush end tap. Then I'll put a bolt in over the washer. If you had to you could put a brass bolt in with the head ground down to look appropriate.

    Good luck with the project,
    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  3. #3
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    I just finished the disassembly of one myself and the answer is yes just file the peened end of the threaded shaft down until the knob comes off. It's no problem to re-peen it later with a ball peen hammer, they do come in hand every once in a lifetime. I wondered why I had three different sizes and now I'll be using one. Curt
    So, I just got around to this part this weekend. I very carefully filed a tiny bit off the end of the stud and the nut came right off....THANKS!

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    The rear pivots are either threaded screws with flat nuts, the head of which you can tell by the slot, or they are plain faced and are a rivet with the inside peened over a flat washer. You will have to file there too to remove the rivet. What I'm going to do is drill into the rivet shaft, drill it and thread it with a flush end tap. Then I'll put a bolt in over the washer. If you had to you could put a brass bolt in with the head ground down to look appropriate.

    Good luck with the project,
    Curt
    I have the second type. A rivet and flat washer. I filed and filed and filed. I worked my way into the flat washer and still that thing will not budge. Am I just being too gentle? I'll have to file some moreI suppose.



    Thanks for he help. I've begun to strip the finish off the wood parts that I have been able to liberate from their brass....So far it looks great. I'm using the Formby's Funiture Restore stuff. Seems like it is mostly Lacquer Thinner and something to keep it from evaporating too fast. It really is nice to work with. Much easier than the stripper paste. Am starting to think about Varnishes....


    Really just need to get the bits off the back box now.

  4. #4
    John Jarosz's Avatar
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    I'll recommend 6 or 7 coats of tung oil. You wipe it on and it soaks into the wood. After a few coats you can lightly sand it with 600 grit paper and continue to put on coats until you get the sheen you want. I put two coats on in a day, 12 hours apart. You get a very nice finish this way.

    John

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    BradS's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestion John. I've not used Tung oil finish before. It sounds very time consuming.

    I want the texture of the wood to show...for this project anyway. Is that result possible with Tung Oil? It always sounds to me as though tung oil results in a very smooth, glossy finish...

  6. #6
    Curt's Avatar
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    The shaft is probably expanded in the washer so you may have to gently pry the washer off. Mine was that way. Ting oil is easy to apply and use, try some on an inside surface, you might be surprised. It is easier to touch up in the future too.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  7. #7

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    Tung oil or wax would be the best possible choices for showing the wood's texture, and the tung oil will provide better moisture protection than wax.
    I would not sand between coats. With tung oil it's not necessary for creating a "tooth" for subsequent coats and could load up the grain with sanding dust.
    The film you build up with tung oil is extremely thin, which is what shows the texture, and it has a low gloss.

    Be very sure you follow label directions about handling the rags you use to apply it. That is, they should be spread out flat away from other flammibles until dry and discarded. Do not under any circumstances leave them wadded up, as they can spontaniously combust.



 

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