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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    uk, the shire's
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    20
    Paint stripper based on methylene chloride is the one to use, I too used glass bond for my lenses and it works well.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Shropshire, UK
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    43
    Better stock up on methylene chloride paint stripper, benOM. Our beloved masters at the EU are about to ban it!

    Steve.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Huntington, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    305
    I'm a little late for this but I use Loctite Clear Glass Adhesive. Position lenses, clamp very lightly, put in direct sunlight (cures in a few minutes.) John

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,019
    Images
    3
    Nice thread and I have nothing to add but have a tangential question. I have a ca1884-1902 (based on the company name) 8x10 Gundlach triple convertible lens - the front element is beautiful, the back has an amazing amount of separation - more than I've ever seen before. Sadly, the lens is held into the brass barrel by a peened over edge. How do I remove that or work around it?

    Thanks,
    Dan

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    127
    Hi Dan, when the cemented elements can't be accessed from the other end the only option I've used with success is to cut away the peened-over part and later refix the cell with epoxy. This was always on modern aluminium mounts though where the edge is thinned to almost nothing - any tool inserted between the metal & glass just breaks the alloy into chips.
    People have had some success heating the cell it seems but I was never able to make Canada balsam reflow in this way.
    Others have cited old papers recommending a lathe and a hardwood (ironwood maybe?) tool for the job. I would rotate the chuck or faceplate by hand if I was trying it.
    If the edge is of sufficient thickness and you don't have a lathe you could try a simple version of engineers' v-blocks to let you rotate the barrel in place.
    Two holes in a bench-top, distance apart less than barrel diameter, two tightly-fitting pegs or bars in the holes. Barrel sits on bench with peened element uppermost and is rotated against the two pegs by hand. If properly done this can be extremely accurate.
    Then all you have to do is bring the tool to the work under control - a cross-vise on a fixed angle-block works well enough.
    A dremel tool with tiny saw was how I used to cut away the peened edge - I fixed the dremel in the cross-vise with the above arrangement and it makes for a very quick, neat job.
    A cross-vise can travel in two directions and has a simple micrometer drive for both - in case you were wondering!
    Familiarity with all the tools involved is probably a good idea for this kind of work though...

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