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  1. #21
    Sparky's Avatar
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    what's wrong with bleach? should work. there's no bare metal is there? Even if there were - you'd only have to rub it down.

    painting over dirt/old finish makes about as much sense as painting over a door or cabinet because it's dirty. if it's dirty- clean it....

  2. #22

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    Q-tip with alcohol. Then some white paint. Rub off the overspill when almost dry.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    what's wrong with bleach? should work. there's no bare metal is there? Even if there were - you'd only have to rub it down.

    painting over dirt/old finish makes about as much sense as painting over a door or cabinet because it's dirty. if it's dirty- clean it....
    It might bleach or discolor the blackening treatment on the brass.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulie View Post
    gloss paint and a roller, and oh yes get a life
    easy tiger !

    What's up ? Anything you want to talk about ?
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  5. #25

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    One of my hobbies in the 1980s and 1990s was detailing of anything from cameras to bicycle parts, anywhere there was relief lettering on a background.

    1.Prep. With a Q-tip, dip in soapy water and thoroughly scrub as much of the dirt out as you can. A toothbrush can also be used. Dry thoroughly with a lint-free cloth.

    2. With some white model-making paint (Humbrol, for example) matched to the colour of the lettering to be restored, dip and thin out a fine sable-hair brush and wipe slowly in a straight line right over the area where the lettering is to be restored — DO NOT use a lot of paint: essentially, it must be enough only to fill/cover the lettering to be restored.

    3. Next, tear off a triangular corner of plain white bond paper. Smear your finger in turps and then moisten the surface of the paper in a circular motion. Now whisk steadily that moistened paper in a straight straight over the painted lettering area. Repeat with another unused section of the paper. A finger smeared very, very lightly with turps will also work well but don't press too hard. As you continue you will see over-paint progressively being removed, leaving only paint in that area where it is engraved (or 'set'). Some practice is likely to be needed with this part.

    4. Continue to 'fine tune' the finish until all over-paint has been removed.

    Allow it all to dry. If all goes well, the paint will settle as it dries. Any extraneous overpaint, likely to be extremely fine smears, can be carefully removed with a Q-tip and metho when completely dry (don't use turps for this, as any spill into the in-fill areas will ruin your good work!).

    Same process with areas that use more than one colour. Do one at a time.

    Can you see where I have applied the foregoing on my Manfrotto and GITZO tripods? You can't? Well, must be pretty darned good, hmm?
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 05-07-2010 at 09:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26

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    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  7. #27

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    Laquer-Stick stuff...

    I will agree with what many others have said above about the paint stick stuff (lacquer-stik- or something like that). I have used it on a few cameras and lenses and have been very pleased. It works best on sharply engraved characters- not pressed numbers or letters. The arrow that indicates shutter speed in the second photo would not take the paint stick well, so I ended up using the model paint (the arrow was pressed into the top plate). Just make sure the surface is very clean first- I had removed most of the paint from this contax before coloring in the numbers.

    I wish I had the talent to do the model paint methods mentioned above- but the stick things go much faster (and dry really hard, and wear well).

    Good Luck,

    Matt




  8. #28

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    Thanks for the information - I will report the method(s) I use when I have a chance - I will attempt to clean, then bleach, and as a last resort repaint.

    Thanks again

    nn

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by numnutz View Post
    I have an old lens and the writing on it, stops, and manufacturer details although still there, is so brown it is very difficult to read. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how it can be restored?
    I bought a set of the fill-in paint sticks from Micro-Tools (Europe), green, white, orange, red &c, and they work a treat. Rub over the affected numbers (provided they're engraved, not surface painted), then wipe off the surface excess. Simple, effective, and looks so much better.
    Alex

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