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  1. #11

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    Tung oil isn't even close to being waterproof, I'm afraid. It is, however, relatively easy to touch up. A marine spar varnish might be a better choice if the camera is going to see a lot of time outdoors.

  2. #12
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    Make really tight fitting joints and use epoxy.
    Epoxy is big, big overkill, and, in fact, only makes things tougher on you later should you ever need to perform repairs that involve reversing a joint. In woodworking, there are almost no joints that really call for the use of epoxy. AR glue such as Titebond or Titebond II are absolutely fine. A well-built wooden item should not be held together primarily by the glue, and should almost always have reversible joints. The glue should just provide permanence and reinforcement to the wood-on-wood joints that provide the real stability. The well-carved, tight-fitting joints that you mention are the answer, not epoxy.

    Also, as someone has already mentioned, tung oil is far from "waterproof," but it is a good choice for the finish, IMO.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #13
    richard ide's Avatar
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    I have to disagree about Tung oil not being waterproof. AFAIK Tung oil is the only organic oil which is. I have proof in the furniture I have made and finished with it. After 20 years absolutely no staining and I never use coasters. The finish is as good as at the beginning. Look into the effects of polymerization of the oil.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  4. #14
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    Teak and Purpleheart are on your list. Teak was the wood of choice for "tropicals" in the days of plate cameras because of it's resistance to changes in response to humidity. Purpleheart will eat your cutting tools and is very heavy, but it's like iron in its stability. If your budget/woodworking skills run to these dense hardwoods, they might make a really beautiful camera

  5. #15

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    I'm no woodworker, but we own a garden furniture set made of jatoba. It is very hard, very heavy, and impossible to repair if a screw pulls out. (It's too hard to drill with ordinary tools.) I pity the workers who made the stuff. Long tabletop slats also warp badly. It is relatively weatherproof, however, and has lasted us for 10 years and will last twice as long yet. I wouldn't want to make a camera out of it.

    Peter Gomena

  6. #16
    Ty G
    Cherry, cherry, maybe mahogany, and cherry? I am a bit partial, but it is easy tooling wood, that is not overly prone to chipout and finishes great. The worst thing is to spend all that time on making it, then when it comes to the finishing, it looks like crap and you cannot fix it, because the whatever stain used has soaked deep into the endgrain. I made a camera of birdeye maple, but the chipout on the box joints was close to unacceptable. Teak, well, you may need to do research on gluing it, because it is very oily wood and wants to repel glue. Walnut, well it looks like walnut, I don't like it on a camera and it is not easy to get a good beautiful finish with. I have never used it, but I have seen lots of projects made with it. I am not a fan of the way it looks. I am working on a camera out of curly cherry right now.

  7. #17

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    A camera made from Purpleheart would be awesome to look at, at least for a year or so until it oxidizes and turns to brown.
    Teak isn't so tool-friendly either, but it would make a sturdy, if somewhat heavy camera.
    My first choice would be cherry, but I like to stick with domestic woods, plus cherry smells good when you cut it.
    I agree with 2f/2f that epoxy isn't necessary, and would make repairs difficult, though it's sometimes used for stuff like Teak which has a lot of oil which can make joining it with white glue difficult sometimes.

  8. #18
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Ty - 20x24" studio Q forum Ty ?

    Nice camera - I'm making a similar style tailboard, but with two folds around the centre, like the Century - rear movement will have a similar mechanism to a Deardorff, shift if ever I need it will just be two tilts ... I was wondering why the bellows was so huge at the front end, and indeed why such a large front standard, I've been introduced to some very large lenses online recently, Dallmeyer 8D I think, some HUGE Darlot cone centralisateurs and my own Voigtlander which as large as it is still pales in comparison to the aforementioned lenses but I still wonder about the lens that your standard and bellows could carry !

    The examples of Cherry I have seen here were quite twisty when eyeballing the length - I'll certainly revisit the wood at some other merchants.
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  9. #19
    Ty G
    Nick, yep, that's me. If I remember correct, the bellows at the front were 19" square. Why? .. The larger, or taller the bellows in the front, the less chance that the bellows sagging will get in the image. Also, to accomodate the rise/fall. Basically, what I did what make the front of the bellows just a bit bigger than the hole that is behind the rise/fall lensboard. Why such a large front standard? Well, I had two camera designs that I liked and felt would be good to reproduce; one of them was Luther Gerlach's camera, and Patrick Alt's camera. Luther's is 22x30 (now 25x30) and Patrick's is 18x24, I think. I made the width of the front standard just big enough for the rise/fall and all to fit. The lensboard is 10.5" and every bit of that is needed if you have period lenses, I know, I mounted two of them on the camera.

    I need to get around to posting that camera on APUG. Maybe this evening, I'll put it up here.

  10. #20
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    This is interesting stuff - I'm doing research at the moment, trying to but out the ideal design for me... Kind of hard in isolation, in that I have no cameras to actually see, just pictures on the net - I'm afraid I might misinterpret the way something goes together and miss out an opportunity to make a better camera with the same amount of effort.

    Often when someone puts up a picture of their newest creation everyone will say 'wow! nice camera' 'great work!' etc... which is nice and all - nothing like a community of like minded spirits huh - but, sometimes upon analysis and knowing of all the variation over the years that there will be a better way to have made such and such feature - sure, some people don't need swing, some don't need a massive front standard, some people aren't fussed by the fold down size, some will be using modern light weight or at least centre balanced lenses, some don't know a dovetail or mortise and tenon from a screwed dry butt joint - so there will be a different camera for every person but still I get the feeling that after all these years and years of evolution (that kind of died (?) in the 30's (?) with the advent of smaller and smaller cameras being made out of newer metal technology, the kind of stuff that is a bit harder to replicate in a home workshop) that maybe there is actually a 'perfect camera' - it's getting in the way of me building one, this persistent niggling feeling

    I rant - guess I'm asking, did you ever start thinking this way or did you just dive on in ?
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

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