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  1. #31
    Curt's Avatar
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    Yes, I filed them out, it wasn't really that hard, just drill the holes close together and the material in between can easily be filed out, and there is a rack and pinion gear on the front extension. The rear slots are on a curve, no harder than a straight slot. I'm not saying this design is that pretty or great etc.. and the front knobs replaced some wood ones. Making a camera today I would definitely buy or make some brass knobs. I'd get a small lathe and turn them or have someone do it. Either way the knobs would look better than these.

    The camera is fully functional, one thing to remember is to try to standardize on a size of fastener, it makes it easier to build and assemble. The sizes I used on this are too small and makes the assembly tedious. I think 4-40 would be a good neighborhood. You will have different head types and lengths of course. All kinds of fastener finishes are available, I think either brass or stainless steel ones look very good and hold up well. Brass shafts along with brass pinions are easy to assemble. Brass racks and pinions work very well. There are plastic and synthetic racks as well as stainless steel.

    Some cameras have been made from aluminum with great success and there are many different types of focusing too.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  2. #32

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    One thing to think of for the type of wood, is compare it to a gunstock.
    A gunstock must support the barrell for a significant length, and any warpage will place pressure on the barrel causing it to shift it spoint of impact from shot to shot as the barrel temperature changes.
    There is a good reason why most rifle stocks are made from quarter sawn walnut.
    That said, there are Ash, Cherry, anda load of other timbers used in gunstocks from time to time, but walnut is the classic and most common.
    Being a fellow Antipodean, I have had good success with rifle stocks making them from Highland Beech aka Tasmanian Myrtle.
    Nice and stable, easy to work, nice colour.
    Also for me quite affordable as I have half a garage full of it...

  3. #33
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Nick , You can make hybrid wood and it makes rotting stop. You can buy wood from a wood supplier but wood become crystalized after 100 years.

    I advise you to visit instrument makers and buy maple and mahagony , cut 2 cms strips and glue with natural instrument glue , when you become needed to disassemble the pieces , only you have to heat and voila , parts are at your hand.

    There is two ways to dry the woıod , first industrial furnaces for this purpose.They heat the wood for 24 hours and every moisture escapes , some wood crystalinized.

    And than apply some chemical sold under HEMEL name and its sucked by wood and stop the moisture effect.
    And this process are used for wooden homes and increase the life of wooden plates.This technology called impregnation and best technology to make these parts life longer.

    I think you must use the lightest wood possible to able to carry your machine faraway.

    If I were you , I use balsa , carbon fiber hybrid plates. It is used by olympic rowing equipment makers and its lightweight and very strong.

    Than you can apply the most exotic wood veneer on to balsa and be happy.

    Balsa is lightweight and shipping cost is so low.

    As you know , boat makers uses two layer of fiber reinforced plastic and a balsa , polycarbonate or paper core. The thickness and double layer is so strong and so low weight.

    You can make a carbon plate , when wet add another layer of exotic veneer and vacuum bag and make hybrid plate.

    You dont need to make these cameras from gorilla weight woods.

    WEST is number one boat making epoxy and means wood epoxy saturation system.

    If you visit boat builders and explain what you are after , may be you can get glass , aramid , carbon , borax fibers very cheap and use their vacuum back system and the oven for faster polymerisation.


    If you have any question , I help.
    Veneer , carbon hybrid lutes are coming from French maker and they are very handsom .

    If you have no money and want the strongest and cheapest materials , look to www.duckworksmagazine.com and the store and use glass fiber , polyester hybrid.

    Rolls Royce uses this technology at the interior of their cars and you can buy cocobolo , walnut , spalted maple veneers from their supplier , not expensive really.

    If you want to see exotic veneers use , visit alembic guitars and have fun.

    Best ,

    Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Istanbul

  4. #34
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    If you're not trying to be traditional, I'd go for some laminate wood like used in the custom rifle/pistol business. It can be as classy or wild as you want.

    Google for laminate wood (stock, grip)

    and see the beautiful variety. Laminated wood will have the most resistance to warping and be very stong.

  5. #35
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I just had a new standard made for the Quarter plate camera I'm restoring and the joiner/carpenter used Oak. it took 2 attempts to match the stain of the rest of the camera, I ended up boiling up my Robilius tea bags (Red Bush) and got a perfect match.

    Ian

  6. #36
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    Sapele is very sable. I use it to make violins. It is easy to work with and can be finished very nicely. I agree with Steve. If you have lots of wood working experience then you may already know that. Maple and Walnut are both stable woods.The moisture content is important for stability. around 10%
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  7. #37
    Curt's Avatar
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    Ebony would be beautiful.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #38
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    ebony is sameweight of steel , if you want to be a heavy weight champ , dont waste your money , start to halter

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