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  1. #1

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    DIY Light Meter Sensor Quesiton

    Any information on sensors for light meters, and color response, sensitivity and information like that? Links, Comments, most anything to get me started int he right direction.

    Interested in a low light capable DIY meter project for the winter.

  2. #2
    jamesgignac's Avatar
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    Uh, wow - I just want to follow this thread to see what comes up. Sorry Grif I have no info of my own - in fact I couldn't imagine putting together my own meter but I suppose there must be some benefit to doing so. I've always been happy with my Luna Pro but I'm tickled pink to know there's a diy-er out there who's taking on something I never thought of.

    Best of luck!
    -dereck|james|gignac
    dereckjamesgignac.com

  3. #3

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    I've been thinking about such a project myself. Check out ISL 29102. digi-key has is for under $3. Add a button-cell battery, a variable resistor and an LED and you're done.

  4. #4
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    I've made 3 exposure meters plus several densitometers/enlarging meters. Easiest thing I've found for covering the whole brightness range from moonlight to sunlight is a device like the TAOS TSL230R. All my exposure meters are based on this chip. Since it's silicon photodiode based, it requires IR and red filtration for good color response...although with no IR filtration, vegetation is several stops "brighter" than it should be, so maybe you could try to make an IR light meter with it.

    You might also check out visual-corrected photodiodes, with integrated fractional-exponent amplifiers, like the LX1973a, LX1970, or LX1971. Note that most B&W film is sensitive to UV and deep red well outside of the luminosity function, however, so you have to decide for yourself if a visually-corrected sensor is really ideal for an exposure meter. Also, most of these will conk out/saturate in full sunlight, so covering the whole brightness range with them might require some engineering.

    My best meter I made is a microcontrolled one with a 32-character LCD, AAA powered, 0.05 degree spot/incident meter with Aperture priority, Shutter priority, Ev mode, ability to either take and store readings or 'scan' by holding the button down, brightness range from <<0 to 15, film speeds from 25-3200, and only 1x1x3 inches. So it's pretty much the best lightmeter in the world by my estimation.
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #5
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    So it's pretty much the best lightmeter in the world by my estimation.
    Then perhaps you should provide a link to the plans and circuit diagram!


    Steve.

  6. #6

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    Interesting device, down to 0.3 Lux is good,,, seems like the chart I was looking at had twilight down to 0.1

    Anyone know what the (I know,,, how hi is up) light level is at the ground glass of a view camera if I was looking to put a "spot" probe together?

    I guess I just need to hack something together on a breadboard and just try it out.

    Looked at the ISL 29102 data sheet. Looks like the voltage out is usable as a light level directly, didn't really think about the tempature curve (values) but it did seem to be an issue at ambient temps.

    FYI, I'm way more involved in the gizmo effect of the various hobbies I have than the actual hobby. Never been sure if that's good thing, or a bad thing,,, but as things go, and I do like things,,, it's way easier on my liver and marriage than the cute little hottie at the local tav ;-)

  7. #7

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    This blog has a good write up of using the TAOS TSL203R with an Arduino microcontroller to build a light meter.

  8. #8

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    Great info BetterSense,,, I'll go take a look

  9. #9
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Oh great. Yet another project to fill up my time. Jeez.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  10. #10

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    Naw,,, we can hack up the hardware,,, the big value is the code for the PIC. I'm mostly still a solder and wire sort of programmer during my off hours, even though my paycheck depends on databases and opsys's.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Then perhaps you should provide a link to the plans and circuit diagram!


    Steve.

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