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  1. #11
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    I ended up just sanding a piece of plexi with medium sand paper on orbitable hand sander. Worked really well. No "hot spots". Won't have to worry about breaking the GG either.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzingoose View Post
    You can try a 1/32" glass from your local hardware store and sodium hydroxide. Just brush it on, wait a few minutes and rinse off. It leaves a fine grain very smooth surface.
    A 14x17 - inch sheet of 1/32" glass? at a hardware? and lye etches glass? Alternate universe, perhaps??

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe VanCleave View Post
    I've had good results using 600 grit emory on a random orbit sander, on 2mm Lucite sheet plastic, available from big box hardware stores in US. It's not glass, but it's also inexpensive and easy. And the results are pretty good.

    I've also done the same with the 8.5"x11" plastic fresnel sheet magnifiers, available from Staple's office supply. The reverse side is flat, and takes the emory sanding pretty good. Then orient the sanded side toward the lens, and you have a GG with built-in fresnel.

    ~Joe
    A couple of good ideas Joe!

  4. #14
    Sethasaurus's Avatar
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    Sodium Hydroxide won't do anything to glass.

    I've used the technique Ian uses and it works very well. It takes longer than an orbital on some plexi, but if you want to keep it old-school and use glass, the grinding paste is the best way.

    One idea I had was to get the guys that do sand-blast etching on glass to do a piece, but I haven't found anyone local yet..

  5. #15

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    I made a 4x5 ground glass using Ian's approach. Using rock polishing grit as I had some available. Seemed to work pretty well, though it's easy to miss very small spots unless very careful. I just used 1/8" thick glass from hardware store. I did use sandpaper on edges first so they weren't too sharp.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  6. #16
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    Get a tube of valve grinding compound from the auto or hardware store. Get two pieces of glass or plexiglas. Mix a bit of the compound into water to make a paste, apply between the sheets of glass, and rub them together, as randomly as you can. Easy and safe. And you get two pieces of GG.

    NaOH(aq) will etch glass but it is very slow with most glass.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  7. #17
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    My dad told me how he made one once when he was much younger out of a scrap piece of glass. I took him a week using fine sand and water by the river, to grind down by hand.

    One of his many stories, he also made a contact printer as well. My favorite of his tales is how he constructed his own quartz radio out of random parts, and how he strung up a complex antenna array on the roof of his house to get reception from around the world. All by reading instructions from books.

  8. #18

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    Sorry if I misled you. I thought it was the active ingredient in Armour Etch (the product I was referring to but could not remember for the life of me). If thinned slightly and applied generously, it will give an even etching.
    Gun Control is like: Reducing drunk driving by making it harder for SOBER people to buy cars.

  9. #19
    dehk's Avatar
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    Why don't you just use some WAO white aluminum oxide and do it right?

    get them at http://gotgrit.com/

    I've bought from the store before, didn't have a problem with it.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  10. #20

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    Over the years I have tried Sand blasting (far too coarse!!) bead blasting (better but still too coarse) valve grinding paste (better again and now getting into the 'usable' range) and orbital and vibration sanders using aluminium oxide (better again if you can avoid hot spots and unevenness).

    None of them give nearly as good results as using some fine powdered grit and using a glass block as a grinding blank. Find the instructions that Ian Grant posted here on APUG.
    Steve

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