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  1. #11
    Jeff L's Avatar
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    >>>Note to novices: you turn the screwdriver to the LEFT (counter-clockwise) to unscrew it. <<<


    Ah yes. Lefty loosey - righty tighty.
    Advice from my sarcastic airplane mechanic friend.

  2. #12
    Sethasaurus's Avatar
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    I've found, while working on a lot of older cameras with slotted screws - the screw slot is significantly thinner than the screwdriver you might want to use.

    That is - the screw head may be e.g. 3mm diameter and you might pull out a 3mm slot-head screwdriver but it won't fit. Then you get tempted to step down to a smaller size driver which fits in the slot. This often results in making the top of the screw look ugly when it slips because you can't apply enough torque to move it.
    It's nice to have precision-made, lifetime-warranty tools that will always work (I like Snap-On tools), but it is also easy to get hold of a few decent screwdrivers for next to nothing and shape them to your needs.

    Another tip for stuck screws is to place the driver in the slot (or cross or hex, etc) and give it a firm whack. That often helps to break up any gunk or glue that may be making it stick. Metal jeweller's screwdrivers can handle this but you may tend to mangle the plastic ones or push the shaft into the handle.

    Swearing and threatening it sometimes helps too

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by TerryM View Post
    I knew that somebody was going to bring up the unlikely scenario of a reverse thread. Have you ever actually encountered a reverse-threaded screw on a camera? :
    You will be laughing out of the other side of your mouth when you hit one.
    Pentax has used them on the Spotmatic series. They also changed the damn things to RH threads toward the end of the Spotmatic production. I recollect a lefty on the OM cameras, but that's a recollection, not a memory.
    The best advice would be to use a screwdriver that is a correct fit, snug and the diameter of the screw head.

    The headless screws you refer to are called "set screws"
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #14
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    reverse threads:

    lefty righty, tighty strippy


    The cold spray thing - I often worked the inverse of that and heated up the outside (the 'nut') - works just as well (or not) as the cold on the bolt gag
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by nick mulder
    The Mamiya RZ67 ProII back uses reverse threads (assuming we're talking metal thread/bolts and plastic screws also ?) ...
    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer
    You will be laughing out of the other side of your mouth when you hit one.
    Pentax has used them on the Spotmatic series. They also changed the damn things to RH threads toward the end of the Spotmatic production. I recollect a lefty on the OM cameras, but that's a recollection, not a memory. ...
    I don't know who came up with the stupid idea of a reverse-threaded screw, but that person should be SHOT! The reverse thread is a much dumber idea than "metric" threads! I fully support the metric system, but not for threads.

    Quote Originally Posted by AgX
    1mm is waaay too much tolerance, even for "around the house" screws! ...
    I was referring to the diameter of the screwdriver. I had bought precision screwdrivers -- going down to 1mm -- before attempting to open the camera. The lens needed 1mm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sethasaurus
    ... This often results in making the top of the screw look ugly when it slips because you can't apply enough torque to move it. ...
    Swearing and threatening it sometimes helps too ...
    Try my three techniques the next time you attempt to open a camera. You'll see how successful they'll be.

    In the case of nuts and bolts, just use an adjustable wrench, and make sure it fits extremely tightly around the nut. Then just "tap" the end of the wrench handle with a hammer to jar the nut loose. This worked successfully for me even with those delicate aluminum "flare nuts" which hold the brake lines on your car. It beat spending $8 bucks to buy a special flare nut wrench.
    Mr. Terry Mester

  6. #16
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    Put a small dab of valve grinding compound (a very gritty compound) on the screwdriver tip before mating to the screw and attempting to remove. The grit will bind the screwdriver to the screw, and often will prevent the screwdriver from slipping on the screw head.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    1mm is waaay too much tolerance, even for "around the house" screws!......
    1mm is .039 inches, the thickness of a match paper match, that is plenty of gap. Oh, we want a tight fit.

    I'm sure they meant 0.1mm it was just a misplaced decimal.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  8. #18
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    reverse threads are useful ...

    essential even in some applications - the ones they are used for
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  9. #19

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    The key is to use a high quality screwdriver that fits the screw head perfectly. Too big and you strip the screw head, too small and you can't get the torque required to release the screw and probably will strip the head as well.

    The screws used in most consumer electronics are of very poor quality. While working at Canon, it was common procedure to replace removed screws with new ones, especially within lenses.

  10. #20
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Jeweller's screwdrivers with adjustable torque, some of which come in magnetised form, would be a wise investment; as AndrewK said, consumer electronics stores issues have lousy products which can break, damaging the screw, the equipment you are working on and possibly even cause injury. Screws that are difficult to remove and are removed eventually should be replaced. Canon replaced all the tiny screws in my EOS 5 about 10 years ago when it was in for major display driver and drive servicing.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

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