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Thread: Rolleicord V

  1. #1
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Rolleicord V

    Hello All,

    I have a Rolleicord V in my possession and it seems from the research that I've done that the shutter blades are stuck. Rather than taking it in for a repair (I'm a broke college student), I wanted to try to fix it myself. I read that the leather on the front of the camera has to be lifted up to get to the screws. However, when I tried lifting the leather up (with a very small flathead eyeglass screwdriver) it started to crumble and break apart VERY easily. I can see some brown material when this happens. I want to try to fix it but am afraid to ruin the leather. Is there any way to get to the shutter blades without ruining the front? I have no experience repairing camera's, but I thought it would be worth a try. Any information would be GREATLY appreciated.

  2. #2
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    The leather is probably brittle with age and will be ruined no matter what you do. That said, please don't screw up this beautiful camera by trying to fix it yourself. You don't have the tools or the training and you will screw it up permanently. Repairmen go to school for this, it is a complex job and a skilled trade. I've screwed a couple of things up myself trying to save money, its not worth it. Just pay someone to do it right. Will cost about $150, which is not bad, it'll work for decades after that.
    Chris Crawford
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  3. #3
    guitstik's Avatar
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    Check out www.kyphoto.com or this site http://www.willegal.net/photo/photo-first_page.htm As you can see there are several places on the web that are informative. You might also try the the Rollei club web site for some info. Good luck and welcome to APUG.

    Joel
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    And sleep to dream till day
    Of the truth that gold can never buy
    Of the bawbles that it may.

    www.silverhalidephotography.com

  4. #4
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chriscrawfordphoto View Post
    The leather is probably brittle with age and will be ruined no matter what you do. That said, please don't screw up this beautiful camera by trying to fix it yourself. You don't have the tools or the training and you will screw it up permanently. Repairmen go to school for this, it is a complex job and a skilled trade. I've screwed a couple of things up myself trying to save money, its not worth it. Just pay someone to do it right. Will cost about $150, which is not bad, it'll work for decades after that.
    Thanks for the advice. Just in a hurry to get it working I suppose. I'm a full time student which hasn't left time for a job = no spending money. However, once I get some cash I'll definitely send it in for a proper repair.

    Quote Originally Posted by guitstik
    I tried both of those websites before posting here. That is where I figured out that the screws were located the under the leather. Which led me to this post, if I could take the front off without ruining the leather. After reading chriscrawfordphoto's , I think I'll just wait till I have some money for a proper repair.

  5. #5

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    So as someone who has worked on a few cameras, trying to do exactly what you want to do...

    Assume the first 2-3 cameras you touch you will kill. If you are committed to doing this yourself, try to find a few cheap cameras with similar problems and work on them first. Even if the camera is substantially different, lots of the lessons carry across cameras (how to avoid stripping screws, what to touch and what not to touch, how far you really want to go disassembling, how to document your steps so you can reverse them, etc).

    I did manage to fix an Autocord with stuck blades (it took two tries to get it clean enough to work reliably) but not until I botched an attempt at repairing a FED 2 (which had a broken roller when I started and was dead anyway) and a Trip 35. Took apart and reassembled a few other cameras before tackling ones I really wanted to work. I still stay out of shutters, as much as I'd like to fix a slow one in a Rolleicord. I haven't had a good practice camera for that yet and barely managed to get a Olympus 35SP shutter back together after disassembling it a bit too far.

    It is possible to fix cameras yourself with a bit of experience, but there is certainly big learning curve and a lot of risk involved. Many repair people will refuse to work on cameras after amateurs fail repairs as it can be difficult knowing what state anything is in.

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    Greg Heath's Avatar
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    Aaron,

    I love the Rolleicord also. I found one on the "bay" about 2 years ago for a song. I didn't have the cash to have it refurbished either, but I found the exploded view if the camera online and joined a repair forum and it took me quite awhile to fix it, but it works great now. You have to really define who you are before you tackle this sort of thing. If it doesn't bother you of the camera ends up as parts and you want to learn, then I would say go for it. I had never worked on any camera ever, but I used a digital camera and purchased $200 worth if the right tools to get started. If you have the right tools, then that's 80% of the toughness of the job. Don't let anyone convince you that you have to be superman to fix cameras or shutters. My first shutter that I tore down was the Compur Rapid and it was a bear, but I had patience and used my digital camera to record my progress, but I enjoyed the learning curve too. At times I wished I had sent the thing to someone with experience, because it was a
    Bitc*. I even tore all the old leather off it and purchased new leather at
    Cameraleather.com. So worth it.

    I will say that setting the shutter timing is difficult without a shutter timer. I just purchased one last week $30.

    You really have to make sure the shutter timing is right because all your pictures will suck if it's not right.

    If you want to just use your camera, then send it to someone knowledgable for $200 you will have a new camera. If you like figuring stuff out and methodically learning thru trial and error do it yourself. But any way you do it, just do it the best you can an have fun, just don't whatever you do don't disassemble the aperture. That was a mother to get back together.

    Greg



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    I have the same camera in good condition. It's a tough call because working unit can be purchased for about the same price it will take to have professional do a CLA. Just a straight repair may be less.

    I've fixed few lenses and minor issues in cameras before but nothing as serious as shutter assembly. My rule is, I will only DIY a repair if valuation of the equipment is such that having someone else do the work is just plain silly. In other words, it doesn't work now so if I screw it up badly, there is nothing lost. If I get it working - then it's all gain.

    For example, I fixed Mamiya 645 with a flash contact problem. Body can be had in the condition for less than 75 dollars. Professional repair starts around that price and that wasn't the only issue with the camera. I knew it was an electrical contact issue and I knew how to get to it and what it looks like before I went in.

    I also fixed a 50mm EL-Nikkor with fungus and few other enlarger lenses. It's just plain silly to send this type of thing in for a professional CLA.

    The decision is yours to make. The worst possible outcome is to totally trash the camera beyond reasonable repair. More likely outcome is to get it to work somewhat sometimes. With no experience and having no reference, I don't think you can get it to work within spec.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
    jmcd's Avatar
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    For a lasting job on the Rollei, the shutter blades will need to be completely disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled. Not every repair person does this, so for a lasting job I recommend you ask outright. Those who do the complete overhaul will be glad to tell you so.

  9. #9
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Just single music note , dont ruin the camera , if you have not money to repair , wait. Its a historical thing and it must be treated as it deserves.

  10. #10
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone. Definitely going to wait now. I for sure don't want to ruin the camera.

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