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  1. #1

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    the tiny little rivet for a pop up hood

    does anyone here have a good way to fix the tiny little rivet
    that keeps a pop up tlr hood .. popped up ?
    i have the original tiny little rivet but it doesn't like the hole anymore
    and the channel on the side piece of the hood doesn't like the rivet ...
    any suggestions ?

    thanks !

  2. #2

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    The hole has worn to the point that it's bigger than the rivet?

    How much room is there for a larger fastener?

  3. #3

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    hi barry

    the hole is a little loose now
    and if i put a larger fastener,
    it won't fit the channel

    J
    ask me how ..

  4. #4

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    Are you up for learning how to manufacture ONE tiny little rivet?
    Hobby shop is the source for brass wire the diameter of your rivet. it's a foot long so you can make spares if you like.
    Before you cut the stuff up, grab either end with a good pair of pliers or vise grips slightly inside of the end. Leave .5-1mm showing and beat it with a hammer. Won't take much. Once you have something that won't fall through the hole, cut it to length, insert it and try squeezing a burr on the outside OR take a nail set and peen the end over. To peen it you're going to have to back the rivet up. don't know how much room you have. strike it softly and you shouldn't have a problem.
    You might also look for brass dress makers pins and work from those, that way one end already has a head on it.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #5

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    thanks john !
    i might just do what you suggested

    john
    ask me how ..

  6. #6

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    And if you don't want to peen it or find it is too tight after peening, instead, use a drop of epoxy on the inside end to form a ball like nut to keep it form falling through.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  7. #7
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    If I got it right, you might try with one of those "broken" washers, you can force it around the rivet neck, under the head, and it will stay in place until you force it out of position. It should make a collar that will prevent the rivet head to pass through the hole, without forcing you to extract the old rivet and make a new one.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #8

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    I like paul ron suggestion of the epoxy, JB weld is a little less runny though.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #9
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    Model train parts are often put together with tiny rivets that are about that size I would think. I have one of those riveter sets with rivets for one of my models. They used to be sold by Bowser or Walthers.

    PE



 

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