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  1. #11
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Wade,

    Either I have been very lucky or the above posters have made this task far more complicated than I needed. If they already have the tools, that is good use of them. I have had to do it this way because I don’t own some of the sophisticated cutting tools mentioned (lathe, Bridgeport). My only experience is with Sinar aluminum 5 ½” or 14cm boards. I have drawn the size hole needed on the lens board, clamped it in a vise using wood on either side for protection, drilled multiple smaller holes well within the drawn circle, used a saber saw to rough cut a circle smaller than the one needed, and then an appropriately sized sanding drum on a shaft in the drill to grind out to the size needed. I have checked often to be sure the circle I am cutting is round and within the size needed. As with hair cuts, one can always cut more, but never put back.

    When I first needed a hole cut I checked a local machine shop and found a basic set up fee of $75. Some of the specialized photography machinists were more expensive. I bought a set of sander drums for about $10.00.

    John Powers
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichý

  2. #12

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    Sure sanding or filing is all you really need to do, just do it carefully to the finish line and it will be just as good as any machined hole.

    .
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  3. #13
    Wade D's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the tips. Sending it out for milling would be too expensive for this project.
    A friend has a nibbler tool used to make holes in aluminum electronic chassis boxes. I might try that on a piece of scrap and see how it does. Too bad I don't have access to the laser lab at the place I retired from. It would make quick and accurate work of this.

  4. #14
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian C View Post
    I machine aluminum boards on a Bridgeport milling machine using a single-point high-speed steel cutting tool. I always take a test cut in a piece of scrap to verify the hole diameter it produces before machining the lens board.
    Same here.

    The hole needs to be larger than the shutter threads by a significant amount on modern shutters. If you examine the retaining ring on the side toward the shutter you'll find a shoulder. This should go inside the hole, and it determines the correct hole diameter.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    Same here.

    The hole needs to be larger than the shutter threads by a significant amount on modern shutters. If you examine the retaining ring on the side toward the shutter you'll find a shoulder. This should go inside the hole, and it determines the correct hole diameter.

    - Leigh
    Right, except for really thin boards like those for 2x3 Pacemaker Graphics.

    Holes drilled the right size in these little gems allow the edge of centering ridge (that's the shoulder you mentioned, Leigh) to bear directly on the back of the shutter. The result is a shutter that will turn freely on the board with the ring tightened. Darkroom tape around the back of the retaining ring holding it to the board -- not between board and retaining ring -- solves the problem. Using a retaining ring from a Copal-Polaroid MP-4 #1 Press shutter, which doesn't have the ridge, also also solves it but then centering the shutter in the hole is difficult.

  6. #16
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    ... allow the edge of centering ridge (that's the shoulder you mentioned, Leigh)
    Yes, Dan,

    But if I said "centering ridge", nobody would know what I was talking about.

    The first rule of communication is to address your audience using terminology that they understand.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

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