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  1. #41
    Calamity Jane's Avatar
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    I built my first camera from cherry wood. I was not happy with the rigidity.

    I built my second camera from hard Maple and it's solid as a rock. It has become my most used camera by a long shot!

  2. #42

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    Cherry wood has very good dimensional stability and is very hard. In the past clocks were made using cherry instead of metal for the gears.

  3. #43
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    Re: Camera plans

    Quote Originally Posted by MenacingTourist
    You guys are killing me! I would love to build an 8x10 or larger camera, but haven't found any plans really. Alan.
    Hello:

    Camera plans will be available soon. I will be selling the best plans ever published for camera construction by October of this year.

    Barry Young
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  4. #44
    laz
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    Interestingly cherry wood is not very hard. The Janka (or side) hardness test measures the force required to embed a .444 inch steel ball to half its diameter in wood. This is one of the best measures of the ability of wood species to withstand denting and wear. It is also a good indicator of how hard a species is to saw or nail. Both cherry and walnut are suprisingly near the bottom of the scale with scores of 950 and 1010. In comparison mahogony scores 2200 and teak 3540. It is interesting to know that Brazilian Walnut comes in stronget than Teak at 3620.

    I have several large old Black Walnuts on my property from which I have saved every scrap of branch I've had to trim; anyone wanna make a deal?

    -Bob

  5. #45
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    Seems like many field cameras are made of cherry wood -- why?

    Is it perhaps because cherry

    - was readily available to the camera makers in New York in the early 1900's?
    - has beautiful grain?
    - has some some mechanical property which makes it especially conducive to use in camera construction?

    I'm guessing it has something to do with all three but, I really dont know.

    Any ideas?
    Hi,
    Good, straight grain maple. It is stable and light. There is a straight-grained grading convention called "piano action maple" which is used in the action of pianos (duh) because of these properties...EC

  6. #46

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    Hi there,

    laz127: check the Janka rating for purpleheart, bloodwood and cocobola(SP) they should all be much harder. Beautiful wood, extremely heavy and worthless for camera building, they are so hard they would shatter if dropped.

    Just a thought.

  7. #47
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Some of those exotic woods produce hostile sawdust. I stumbled on a list of industrial woods at a school I attended and it had notes for which ones produce occupationally unhealthy dust.

    I think walnut was one. Those of you with black walnut trees are probably aware other things don't grow well under a black walnut tree...pH or other factor?

    I used to do alot of bowl turning in high school and I remember walnut having the foulest tasting dust...I didn't intentionally taste it but it happens sometimes with flying chips.
    Murray

  8. #48
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    When we were machining the purpleheart, Deborah's skin erupted around her chin. It really affected her a lot. I have never seen exposure to exotic woods affect someone so much.
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  9. #49

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    Hi there,

    Felt like sharing, I just found the perfect wood for LF cameras:

    Brazillian Oak

    Just received 2 gorgeous planks, marvelous stuff.

    Too many project, too little time.

  10. #50
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phfitz
    Hi there,

    Felt like sharing, I just found the perfect wood for LF cameras:

    Brazillian Oak

    Just received 2 gorgeous planks, marvelous stuff.

    Too many project, too little time.
    Does Brazillian Oak have another name? It isn't actually an oak but is probably similar in grain structure right?

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