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  1. #31

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    Polygot!
    Reading your post, I am wondering if there is a modern light meter that has interface (serial, USB etc..) so that a computer can read it reading and act upon the value of the reading. With all the modern technology I am just wondering.

  2. #32
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    Ah, now it makes perfect sense.

    I wonder if you can still buy those hand-sized parabolic reflectors that used to be sold in the back of Popular Mechanics. The ones showing someone lighting a cigarette using sunlight? The f/ number should be about one or less, and you don't need an image, so.....

  3. #33
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    Polygot!
    Reading your post, I am wondering if there is a modern light meter that has interface (serial, USB etc..) so that a computer can read it reading and act upon the value of the reading. With all the modern technology I am just wondering.
    The Gossen Digisky has an USB interface.

  4. #34

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    There are such devices out there. Here's one: http://www.fondriest.com/products/extech_407026.htm ... and another http://www.gossen-photo.de/english/l...avomonitor.php. I think that's a lot more capability than I need -- I just need to trigger a photograph at an arbitrary light level. And it would entail putting a computer out in the wilderness. Where there's no power source. And lots of weather ...
    duane

  5. #35
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    Many microcontrollers can do USB (hence talk to the meter) and run on practically no power. If you were considering the light-to-frequency sensor, you probably will need a micro there anyway and I suspect that directly reading the light-to-frequency thing will be much easier than talking to a meter using someone else's proprietary protocol. And much more accurate than a photoresistor, probably with the sensitivity you need.

    I suspect you're about to do a bunch of learning regarding low-power design and software

  6. #36
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    C'mon, guys...

    You're building an Atlas rocket to launch a tennis ball.

    All you need is a photosensor, an opamp, a couple of resistors, a relay, and a battery.

    This ain't rocket science.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  7. #37

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    The chip I use for temperature monitoring applications (MSP430F2012) doesn't have built-in USB support. It's pretty minimalist. And I have no interest in buying another light meter. I think you're right that light-to-frequency chip would be far easier to incorporate than talking to a meter. Likely more accurate than a photoresistor, too. But I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that a simple photoresistor will be accurate enough. A condensor may be needed to get the accuracy I want (a half-stop will be just fine). I'll follow up with the results.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    C'mon, guys...

    You're building an Atlas rocket to launch a tennis ball.

    All you need is a photosensor, an opamp, a couple of resistors, a relay, and a battery.

    This ain't rocket science.

    - Leigh
    I agree, this is getting complicated. Now there iwll be a 500gig computer control center running a USB micro controled sensor circuit.... Let teh countdown begin
    T minus 10
    T minus 9
    T minus 8....
    BLAST OFF!
    Huston we have picture!

    oops... there was dew on the lens.

    Sheit!

    .
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  9. #39

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    Thanks for the advice.

  10. #40

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    Be sure to let us see the pics and the trigger device ou finally settle on using, please?

    This was a fun.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

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