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  1. #41
    Eugen Mezei's Avatar
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    You don't need to travel to Afghanistan. Such cameras were in use here in Romania until the mid or also end of the 80s. I travelled last summer to Bucharest and found one of them in an antiques shop. Ofcourse nothing antique was about it, it was just a box with a lens and the mechanism like described on the website. The linkings were still full of oil, I remember when I took my hand out of the box (they let me play around with it) they were black from oil and grease.

    I am shure in a lot of other countries behind the iron curtain such cameras survived until the curtain fell and they where replaced by then more and more cheaply avaible digital cameras.
    I remember these photographers (sometimes women) waiting their clients in parks or public places in the town surrounded by stuffed animals (most had a bear too but a deer was always present, the bear on two foots, the deer tracking a little car where kids could sit in), cars for kids, sometimes costumes. The target were mostly families with little children that could be set posing with the stuffed animals or sitting in the car, etc. They were active mostly in summer and mostly in towns with (indigeneous) tourist, but not only.

  2. #42
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Cool Thanks for the heads up!

    I showed the video to my students last week and they liked it, I had them all draw the camera, photographer, and sitter to illustrate they understand the concept(with crayons). I should scan some when I have the time. The only thing I had to tell them not to do, is that we dont use our hands for the chemicals in our darkroom hehe =]
    I use my hands to develop sheet film. But i was wondering that. When i put my little fingers on photo paper, it ruins the paper at that location. I wonder why it does not happen to theres

  3. #43
    Eugen Mezei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
    I don't see why they couldn't use direct positive paper instead.
    Guistik, please don't take it as an offense, but this question perfectly illustrates how we have difficulties translate our way of thinking into situations we haven't lived.
    I guess those photographers have big difficulties getting normal photographic paper, and even if they could afford direct positive paper (even we in civilised countries would think twice, did you look at the price difference between normal paper and positive paper?) and even if they clients could afford paying for it they will still have the problem that the material is not avaible. Do you think they would work on paper if they could get at least film? (Btw, the photographers in Romania I talked about used sheet film in their cameras if I remember correctly, although I'm not shure.)

  4. #44
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjbecker View Post
    I use my hands to develop sheet film. But i was wondering that. When i put my little fingers on photo paper, it ruins the paper at that location. I wonder why it does not happen to theres
    Well I have to tell them that because they are kids, once the hands go into the chemicals, they usually end up rubbing their eyes or sticking them into their mouths, so no touching the chemicals in the darkroom without tongs! And always a long wash with soap afterwards when we get out. haha

    To solve your mystery about finger prints on paper, its the cross contamination because you are using your hands. It could even happen if you use the same tongs for every chemical as well. Fixer on unexposed paper will leave white traces when put in developer. Developer or stop on paper before exposure will leave brownish traces. If you must use your hands, use atleast a large container of water that you can rinse your fingers quickly when going between chemicals. You should change this water routinly too. Plus try your hands well before grabbing the next sheet.

  5. #45
    guitstik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugen Mezei View Post
    Guistik, please don't take it as an offense, but this question perfectly illustrates how we have difficulties translate our way of thinking into situations we haven't lived.
    I guess those photographers have big difficulties getting normal photographic paper, and even if they could afford direct positive paper (even we in civilised countries would think twice, did you look at the price difference between normal paper and positive paper?) and even if they clients could afford paying for it they will still have the problem that the material is not avaible. Do you think they would work on paper if they could get at least film? (Btw, the photographers in Romania I talked about used sheet film in their cameras if I remember correctly, although I'm not shure.)
    I take no offense, I was just wondering because it would seem to me that doing two exposures would be equal to the cost of just one with direct positive paper. I understand using paper as opposed to film because it is easier and quicker out in the streets. I just received a lens from a member here and plan on building one of these cameras around it, I think it is fascinating.
    Thy heart -- thy heart! -- I wake and sigh,
    And sleep to dream till day
    Of the truth that gold can never buy
    Of the bawbles that it may.

    www.silverhalidephotography.com

  6. #46

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    A great web site, thanks for the link. I enjoyed the video - including the intermission ! Good luck with your project.

  7. #47
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
    I don't see why they couldn't use direct positive paper instead.
    The only disadvantage would be a reversed (mirror) image.


    Steve.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
    I don't see why they couldn't use direct positive paper instead.
    I enthusiastically bought some Ilford direct positive paper when it came out.

    I found it very difficult to control - it has very high contrast and strange reciprocity characteristics. The contrast seems almost proportional to the exposure. Long exposures usually produced soot and whitewash effects and since it was slow, short exposures were only viable with flash.

    I managed eventually to get a workable regime using pre-flashing and a low contrast developer, but I found it a difficult paper to use and the method had little flexibility.

    Paper negatives on the other hand are quite easy, with the ability to control exposure and contrast at both the negative and positive stages, so even with the ability to obtain positive paper and with the cash to buy it - I would personally prefer a paper negative in my Afghan camera.
    Steve

  9. #49
    guitstik's Avatar
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    I have never personally used direct positive paper only heard of its usage, I was simply postulating on the viability of it as an alternative. I had thought about using it when and if I ever get around to building my own camera.
    Thy heart -- thy heart! -- I wake and sigh,
    And sleep to dream till day
    Of the truth that gold can never buy
    Of the bawbles that it may.

    www.silverhalidephotography.com

  10. #50
    altair's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing the link, mighty interesting.

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