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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington area
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    473
    I've never had any of the leg locks on my old (from the '60s) aluminum Gitzos freeze up, but the rubber grips on all of them have disintegrated over time and become useless. If you ever experience this, just use a sharp knife, e.g. an Exacto, to remove the grips and then apply some 3/4-inch wide friction tape (Lowes has this) to wind several wraps around the lock rings (to desired thickness). It works great. I've done this to ALL my Gitzos, all lock rings, all sizes up to 1-5/8-inch diameter. An extra benefit: tape acts as a good insulator and is more comfortable with bare hands in freezing temperatures.
    Last edited by silveror0; 12-10-2011 at 12:59 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: additional thought

  2. #12
    Lloydy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Coalbrookdale, Shropshire
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    20
    When my 25 year old Gitzo got a bit cranky I contacted the UK importers, which is now the Manfrotto importers, and they sent me all the bushes for the legs - for free. But don't say I told you.

  3. #13
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,699
    Welcome Lloydy!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,241
    I'd try the strap wrenches with something between the cam and the lock to spread the pressure. Unless it's really corroded it shouldn't take that much force.
    Disassemble, clean the threads with a steel or brass brush and lubricate with paraffin, ski or candle wax.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

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