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  1. #21
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    I've been doing some online searching too and have a folder "Carbon Transfer" in my favorites. I was reading about the two types, single and double transfer, it appears that single can be less sharp because the negative has to be placed in contact with the emulsion side out as to have the image correctly orientated. Double transfer eliminates this? The light source, bulb type, has an overall effect on the final print also. Would you suggest a book to read prior to the workshop?

    Curt
    Curt, Sandy's advice is sound. Sandy has been printing carbon for some time and is one of the masters in my book. I happen to love the process and have learned a lot about it. Sandy has an article on unblinkingeye.com and a self published book that is very good. There are carbon forums and discussion groups on yahoo and B&S.

    Single transfer is the best process to start with. You print emulsion to emulsion and with a good contact frame or a vacuum frame you will not see any loss of sharpness. If you do it may be slight. BLB bulbs may be less sharp than a plate burner but again it is subjective. The image will be reversed so if you have some writing in your image it will be backwards. You do retain the relief with the single transfer process and I will be teaching the single transfer process. For the purpose of learning the process all this will be discussed.

    Jim

  2. #22
    Curt's Avatar
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    Single transfer is considerably less complicated than double transfer, and relief effect is also a lot more enhanced with single transfer. These days many people print carbon with digital negatives, and we just flip the image file so that the orientation is correct.
    Thanks Sandy, that makes a lot of sense for the orientation using a digital negative, I was looking at the HID for starting out.

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Light/light.html


    This bulb is one listed in the article and is readily available.

    http://www.lightbulbsrus.com/user/pr...il.php?pid=672
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  3. #23
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Curt, I do single transfers. I decide what, when ,why and whatever I am to photograph, knowing that the print will be orientated in the reverse of the negative. So it is not a matter of the image being orientated incorrectly/correctly, but intsead being orientated the way I envision it to be. This allows me to print emulsion to emulsion, and retain sharpness.

    Raised relief is a characteristic of the process that I like to incorporate into my images, and this means that I use single transfer -- as a double transfer tends to hide the relief. As a fluid and flexible process, it seems like everything, from bulb type to pigment type, from sensitizer concentration to final support, affects the final outcome (contrast, sharpness, print color, raised relief, etc).

    Being consistant and keeping records allows one to repeat the successes. Sometimes "mistakes" can lead one to better images, so it can be nice to know what went wrong so that one can do it again! Not knowing one could get raised relief, I noticed a slight slight relief on my early wet prints -- then the gelatin would dry flat. So I tweaked the process until I could keep significant relief after drying the print. Just one way to work the process.

    Modern Carbon Printing by Luis R Nadeau (1986) is the "Bible". I bought a copy long after I began carbon printing. It would have saved some time to have had it earlier! The trouble is, is that it is out of print. A copy is for sale through Amazon.com -- for $247. I should have bought a few of them at $16 each when I have the chance! Christopher James' The Book of Alternative Photographic Processes the second edition has a good chapter (new) on Carbon Printing -- it is a good book to have in one's library. Dick Sullivan and Sandy King both have carbon manuals available.

    The Carbon Printing Forum http://bostick-sullivan.invisionzone.com/ is a great place to ask questions about anything related to carbon printing. If no one knows the answer, there is enough brain-storming going on to figure it out. Sandy King has also started a Yahoo forum.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #24
    Curt's Avatar
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    Vaughn, thank you for the wealth of information, I'll look for the 247 book and keep reading. I know many questions will be answered as I go, I wonder if it's easier to start with B&S tissue. It seems that Formulary has a DEA requirement for select chemicals and B&S doesn't have that stipulation on their web site. I'm going to slowly bring myself up to starter before the workshop and have fun doing it. I have to look at my negatives, a Half Dome on the left while looking at it from the lodge won't do.

    Jim, the relief or texture of the print is of great appeal to me and is one characteristic that initially got me interested. Making the tissue is of course going to be the most valuable part of the process, the ability to control the final color, relief and final look is exciting.

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #25
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    B&S Carbon Tissue is a nice way to start. Besides the standard tissue, they have a thick tissue for raised relief (though you would have to call them to see if any is available and to order it). And warm black and neutral black tissues. You could get a handle on the process quicker with the B&S tissue, and know where you would want to go with your own tissue if/when you go that way later on.

    If you find a combination of tissue and type of negative that is just right, being able to print a consistant portfolio would be easier with a consistant tissue -- which is another way B&S tissue works well.

    Once one has worked long enough, one most likely would drift towards making one's own tissue -- for more control/options or perhaps just to have fun experimenting.

    http://bostick-sullivan.invisionzone...&req=si&img=41

    The image linked to above is reversed. Yosemite Falls is backwards as is the writing on the sign to the left. With the aid of a magnifying glass, one can read the sign in the print -- thus the name of the image is the same as the sign -- "Crowning Glory". Reversing Yosemite Falls is a little easier to get away with than Half Dome! And I hope no one tries to use one of my carbons of the face of El Capitan as a climbing guide!

    Vaughn
    Last edited by Vaughn; 08-31-2009 at 02:28 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #26
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Vaughn, thank you for the wealth of information, I'll look for the 247 book and keep reading. I know many questions will be answered as I go, I wonder if it's easier to start with B&S tissue. It seems that Formulary has a DEA requirement for select chemicals and B&S doesn't have that stipulation on their web site. I'm going to slowly bring myself up to starter before the workshop and have fun doing it. I have to look at my negatives, a Half Dome on the left while looking at it from the lodge won't do.

    Jim, the relief or texture of the print is of great appeal to me and is one characteristic that initially got me interested. Making the tissue is of course going to be the most valuable part of the process, the ability to control the final color, relief and final look is exciting.

    The photo that Vaughn posted and one at the base of Bridalveil falls are the images that got me interested in the first place. Once you see them up close and personal it is hard to print any other way.

    Curt
    Curt, I did exactly what you are doing before I took my workshop with Vaughn a while ago. I think the more one researches the process the better. You have an understanding of the procedures involved and what it takes. Once you actually do the steps everything will fall into place.

    As Vaughn has pointed out it is best to start with a tissue that is consistent like the B&S tissue. Check to see if they have the thick tissue if you are looking for relief. I too like the relief and will demonstrate how to pour tissue for relief. I just decided to jump in with both feet and start making my own tissue from the start. We did not pour tissue at the workshop but Vaughn explained it very well and once you do it you will want to do your own. The control I think is one of the key factors that drew me to carbon transfer.

    There are a lot of variables that come into play and the need to make notes is a very important factor if one is going to try for any repeatability. Finding negatives that suit your process will fall into place when you make a print that jumps off of the page. My negatives are all over the place and I'll demonstrate how one can get a very nice print with some difficult negatives.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Fitzgerald; 08-31-2009 at 08:43 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: more info

  7. #27

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    Jim,

    Do you use digital negatives as part of your workflow or are you working with camera original negatives?

    Tom.

  8. #28
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    Jim,

    Do you use digital negatives as part of your workflow or are you working with camera original negatives?

    Tom.
    Tom, my work flow has always been with in camera negatives. I have an 8x10 that I got some time ago and I built 11x14 and 8x20 cameras. I love to use these negatives for my process. At some point in the future I may try the digital negatives but I'm tuned in to my in camera negatives now.

    Jim

  9. #29

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    Now that I've begun experimenting with digital negatives, I'm learning that making digital negatives is a project in and of itself.

    Tom

  10. #30
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    Now that I've begun experimenting with digital negatives, I'm learning that making digital negatives is a project in and of itself.

    Tom
    Now you know why I built big cameras and am sticking with what I know!

    Jim

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