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  1. #11
    Kerik's Avatar
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    As long as "mastery" (a term thrown around much too often, IMO) doesn't mean close-minded or a holder of the Holy Grail of whatever process. As Vaghn said, I often learn things from students simply because they are curious and creative and want to try something I hadn't thought of before. My 15-year-old daughter who prints gum over platinum and can pour collodion plates quite well is a great example of this.

    Her: "Hey Dad, can I make a platinum print on the interleaving tissue from the digital negative stuff?"

    Me, skeptically: "Ummm, I don't know, it never occurred to me to try it."

    Guess what, it worked quite well!
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  2. #12

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    As a student of a student who is now a TEACHER and me as a student, I'm grateful for that tradition of passing on knowledge of these old and wonderful processes.Just attended a two day workshop that included both Carbon Transfer and Pt/pl printing.Its a bit of a frantic pace at times,but all three teachers were very patient and informative .I would like to thank Jim Fitzgerald,who singly handled the Carbon Transfer till the late hours of the nite(he's gotta to be sleeping at his job this morning).Also Per and Dan who nursed use throw the pt/pl process.After all was done I came throw with a far better understanding of both processes,and a couple of nice prints. What a great leaning experience,and met some very nice fellow students.

    Mike Clark

  3. #13

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    Mastery of the process is obviously very important. Many of our students are teaching, and now many of theirs...! Which in many ways is very flattering. Some are very good at it. When someone asks, should I take his/her class? My advice: First, look at their work. But that is only part of the story.

    My next question is, "Can they teach?"

    It's great for people to share their knowledge. What amazes me is when people assume they can teach, even when they have never taught before. Yes, some are naturals, but some are not. There are skills needed for teaching well. Even a naturally gifted educator will admit that being good at teaching does not just happen. There is an amazing amount of work; thoughtfulness, preparation, anticipation (what your students will ask and need) and of course, communication.

    It's never just the day (or days) you are teaching... with all photography, especially with collodion or other historic processes. There is (or should be) extensive research, practical work and days of preparation beforehand. And lots of reflection and self-criticism after the class, "How can I do that better next time?"

    I never expected to become a teacher and was surprised to find out how much I love it. It's exhausting and incredibly rewarding. But then, I was lucky.... I had great teacher. ;o)

    France
    Last edited by Scully & Osterman; 03-02-2010 at 12:41 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: thought my name was included
    Scully & Osterman Studio
    Rochester, NY 14620
    http://www.collodion.org
    sculloster@gmail.com

  4. #14
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik View Post
    Her: "Hey Dad, can I make a platinum print on the interleaving tissue from the digital negative stuff?"

    Me, skeptically: "Ummm, I don't know, it never occurred to me to try it."

    Guess what, it worked quite well!
    IMHO - this is the essence of the process we call learning. It's recursive. It's continous. It's a cycle of maturation. We learn. We become proficient, or we master. We teach others as we learn and in turn are taught by them.

    As a noob, I find it curious that most if not all the workshops I've investigated have as their main focus, printing. I think I understand why.

    The printing process itself is a skill that one has to grasp in order to fulfill one's photographic vision. But why such strong emphasis? All you have to do is look at the threads under this topic. I would think that there should be equal emphasis placed on learning to use the camera as a "tool" first, before indulging oneself in the carbon process, alternative processess and the like.

    I think I'm about 40 pages into Leslie's Stroebel's book and already I have a headache. There are so many more considerations with large format photography that I don't even think I considered coming from 35mm.

    On the surface, the thought of using a LF camera it is very intimidating. Tilts, swings, rises, scheimpflug, bellows factor -- OUCH! my head is hurting already.

    Can someone explain why there are so few workshops on camera technique and so many devoted to printing?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    IMHO - this is the essence of the process we call learning. It's recursive. It's continous. It's a cycle of maturation. We learn. We become proficient, or we master. We teach others as we learn and in turn are taught by them.

    As a noob, I find it curious that most if not all the workshops I've investigated have as their main focus, printing. I think I understand why.

    The printing process itself is a skill that one has to grasp in order to fulfill one's photographic vision. But why such strong emphasis? All you have to do is look at the threads under this topic. I would think that there should be equal emphasis placed on learning to use the camera as a "tool" first, before indulging oneself in the carbon process, alternative processess and the like.

    I think I'm about 40 pages into Leslie's Stroebel's book and already I have a headache. There are so many more considerations with large format photography that I don't even think I considered coming from 35mm.

    On the surface, the thought of using a LF camera it is very intimidating. Tilts, swings, rises, scheimpflug, bellows factor -- OUCH! my head is hurting already.

    Can someone explain why there are so few workshops on camera technique and so many devoted to printing?
    Camera technique for view camera would make a good work shop.I have been doing what you have in Reading about such technique in forums and books over the years and a lot of trial and errors,I suppose if I were more serous about it going to a collage like Brooks or Art Center would be the thing to do.Never intended on making a career of Photography.
    Mike

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