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  1. #41
    Aristophanes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    This is exactly right, even when someone makes a print in the darkroom, they want to promote / show it. Even well known fine art is shown via the web. There should not be as dark of a line drawn in regards to APUG and hybrid photo, it is not doing anyone favors here.
    It's not a threat, it's an opportunity.

    Flickr is loaded with excellent analog samples and thoughtful proponents.

    I agree that putting analog work from supporters here behind a paywall is self-defeating.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    Just found this on rangefinderforum "Put your Kodak Moment on CNN
    http://ireport.cnn.com/topics/726798?hpt=hp_bn1
    That is where I have to personally draw the line for my needs and wants, I don't support an outlet that exploits free content over good content for a bottom line, especially after they just laid off a bunch of staffers. But that is a whole other story...

  3. #43
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    There is a thread on APUG dedicated to promoting film

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum50/5...-film-use.html
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #44
    MDR
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    I am not a friend of CNN (and most of todays media conglomerates) either I only saw the link on the Rangefinderforum/took a quick look and thought that it could be interesting.

    Sirrius Glass thank you for the link I wasn't aware of that thread

    Dominik

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    I am not a friend of CNN (and most of todays media conglomerates) either I only saw the link on the Rangefinderforum/took a quick look and thought that it could be interesting.
    That's why I said my needs...:-)

    Any info is good info, lets keep this up!!

  6. #46
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Wet is a plate too far for me

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    However, in a stretch, if Film vanishes, how many of you really want to learn how to make it? Really. For your own use?

    Practically no one wants to. Out of the APUG membershop of over 50,000, I find about 50 people interested. What kind of interest is that? I think that the really serious users here number around 500.

    PE
    Wet is a plate too far for me, and I count myself dedicated - I hope film will last in the way fine printmaking papers and inks are still made and even etching presses

    Too keep silver jelly going the more of us that buy and use silver jelly materials the longer small manufacturers will survive

    Should film manufacture disappear I will return to charcoal drawing - For printmaking I still have a pile of copper and zink in my studio and all the inks etc, but etching is even more process oriented than photography, so it will be charcoal drawing

    Also, as I have already typed, every time we exhibit be clear about the process used, like other printmakers do
    Last edited by John Austin; 01-07-2012 at 08:24 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: reogranise sequence of thoughts

  7. #47
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    Umm, where did wetplate come from regarding my post quoted above?

    PE

  8. #48
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    I've been so focused on APUG and dedicated film publications that until recently I did not know how common it is in popular photography circles to act as if film were dead and buried. Another way we should be promoting film use is by taking opportunities to speak up like Mark Twain and protest that reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated. I just reviewed a book on Amazon.com, "The Passionate Photographer" in which I pointed out how its treatment of contemporary film photographers was completely misleading and unfair to the tens of thousands of passionate film shooters who are out taking pictures every day. And recently Brooks Jensen, of all people, posted a commentary on one of his Lenswork blogs in which he mourned the loss of 'depth of field' as an artistic tool, suggesting it is one of the casualties of our digital age (he concluded by saying, "When I stumble upon this affect and see it so successfully used it brings back fond memories of a photographic technique I miss dearly.") I posted a comment that if he missed depth of field and bokeh, he could find many beautiful examples of both every day in the galleries of APUG.org, and that he might choose to shoot a roll of film from time to time, as needed, to scratch that itch.

    We won't influence those who insist on writing that film is dead, but their audiences include a lot of newbies who will believe them if we aren't there politely correcting the record.

    Jim O.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by ostgardlaw View Post
    I've been so focused on APUG and dedicated film publications that until recently I did not know how common it is in popular photography circles to act as if film were dead and buried. Another way we should be promoting film use is by taking opportunities to speak up like Mark Twain and protest that reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated. I just reviewed a book on Amazon.com, "The Passionate Photographer" in which I pointed out how its treatment of contemporary film photographers was completely misleading and unfair to the tens of thousands of passionate film shooters who are out taking pictures every day. And recently Brooks Jensen, of all people, posted a commentary on one of his Lenswork blogs in which he mourned the loss of 'depth of field' as an artistic tool, suggesting it is one of the casualties of our digital age (he concluded by saying, "When I stumble upon this affect and see it so successfully used it brings back fond memories of a photographic technique I miss dearly.") I posted a comment that if he missed depth of field and bokeh, he could find many beautiful examples of both every day in the galleries of APUG.org, and that he might choose to shoot a roll of film from time to time, as needed, to scratch that itch.

    We won't influence those who insist on writing that film is dead, but their audiences include a lot of newbies who will believe them if we aren't there politely correcting the record.

    Jim O.
    At 44 years old, I have been doing photography most of my life at 35 years now, over 20 professionally. I have seen a lot of changes in a lot of things from music, publishing, all kinds or arts including photography. But what I have never seen is the phenomenon that is the enjoyment that people get by saying film is dead, good riddance, don't miss the scratches, etc. I meet and know a lot of photographers from all walks of life and the ones who were great at shooting film and now shoot only digital never put down film.

    The digital and more specifically, the Internet age has either made people stupid or at least prone to saying stupid things. For example, whenever a person asks me why I am using film, they almost always think I have not tried digital yet when in fact, I went digital far before 99% of the world some 18 years ago.

    I just don't understand what has happened to the pride in this craft, there is no reason to put down a medium or spread misinformation within an art form that supposedly gives so many people so much joy.

    But people really do seem to get a kick out of it and it is now so bad, it is unlike anything I have ever seen in any other passion, hobby or craft.

    The only thing more sad than seeing Kodak in the position they are in is that photography has truly turned into a junk show in terms of the digital venom. It's so bad that if there comes a time that there is no more film for me to shoot, I will be done with photography and never look back.

    We need to change the way we do things as analog shooters, it can no longer just be about us. Otherwise, there will be no us...

  10. #50
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    By personal example. If possible, use film and print wet. Show your work, even if it is on the local cafe wall. Teach others.

    I run the teaching darkroom for a university's art department. I volunteered as a darkroom assistant there for 12 years before becoming the paid tech for the past 20 years. In one way or another and to various degrees, I interact with 125 students every semester. I check out, and demonstrate the use, of small, medium and 4x5 cameras. Students come to me for ways to get their ideas onto film and/or onto photo paper -- but I don't teach a class: I have a bachelors degree -- in science! (Actually a BS in Natural Resources Management.) There are another 25 students per semester taking a digital class, but I only see them when they sneak down the hall and use the darkroom. (okay, they don't have to sneak -- they get darkroom privileges too.)

    I have taught younger kids film camera and darkroom work at summer art programs (4th grade thru high school) -- including making their own pinhole cameras, exposing onto litho film and making cyanotypes and silver gelatin prints. I give demos at grade schools and have one scheduled for the high school. Three different classes, I think. All digital classes, but the teacher and I want to give the students a look on the silver side (along with some platinum and carbon). I'll have the 8x10 set up.

    If there is no longer film available, then I will learn how to make my own dry plates. Or perhaps when I am 70, retired and my three boys are out of the house. Whatever comes first. Until then, I will happily buy film and be satisfied with making my own print material (Carbon printing). Though in all honesty, by the time (if ever) film and photo paper are no longer available, I could probably still make new carbon prints from old-but-not-yet-printed negs until I could no longer stand at a darkroom sink. What a backlog!

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.



 

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