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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    That's about the size of it. And there often seems to be some chaos involving the codes, though that can usually be sorted out before the screening.

    The difference in shipping costs is huge, but if you've got a screening in, say, a major museum that can afford a DCP system, and the subtitles disappear for half the movie, then the shipping costs hardly matter.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  2. #12

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    I'd rather wait a few minutes for a splice than get a refund and figure out what to do with the wasted time I set aside for the movie.

  3. #13
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuhead View Post
    I'd rather wait a few minutes for a splice than get a refund and figure out what to do with the wasted time I set aside for the movie.
    I found myself employed to check out the cinema which was engaged to screen the Sydney premiere of Jane Campion's Academy Award winning "The Piano" on the afternoon before the VIP invite screening. Everything was going fine until the lead actor suddenly leaped across the screen about 15 feet in the space of 2 frames.

    Of course I flew up to the projection box to ask why there was a splice and the projectionist (who was running 3 other shows at the same time, as they do) said something like "Oh yeah, we had a bit of a crunch there, but don't worry it's a good splice" I fear that Ms Campion would have spliced his gonads (and mine) if that had happened at the premiere.

    Fortunately we did find another print, well worn but intact. It just required cleaning to get rid of the dust that release prints acquire.

    Now that isn't going to happen with a digital projector.

  4. #14
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Movies aren't getting cheaper. I paid $12 last week here in california and they didn't warn me that it wasn't a print. I think that should be made public, up front. That's the first movie I've seen that way and it didn't look that great. Prices going up, quality going down. Awesome.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  5. #15
    spacer's Avatar
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    Not exactly the same thing, but this reminded me of something I saw today: a retro-cabinet LP player at Target. I think it also plays CDs and MP3s, but the main feature was the big platter sittin' right on top. We have an old cabinet hi-fi that my wife and I are thinking about dusting off... maybe see how well it still works. If it does pretty well, we'll start looking for some old vinyl to spin on 'er.

    As for the topic at hand, I'm still thinking movie film can survive the same way stills can... even a small, yet active group of people can keep an industry alive, even with far smaller numbers than during the heyday. Aviation is an example of sorts. In fact, a lot of pilots I know are also still using film cameras. The guy I bought my Canonet and Kowas from flies an Aeronca, among other things.

  6. #16
    mrred's Avatar
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    I saw my first digital projection yesterday, "Contraband". Blacks were excellent, image was sharp, contrast was low (colours washed a bit) and wide movements flickered. After spotting that it was a digital projection, I forgot about it and got into the move.

    I don't look at the "Mona Lisa" to notice what canvas it is on or what paint was used. If I wanted to do that, I expect I would never get to see the art.

    Yes things change and if it saves the theater life, we are the better. Where else would I buy my popcorn? I shoot film. Big deal. It hasn't exactly made me a better person; I just buy film.

  7. #17
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    I suppose that if you wanted to set up a real--or possibly "retro"--home cinema this could be the time. All those old 35mm projectors may possibly be very cheaply bought soon, and they were all built like brick outhouses. I wonder how much of the sound system remains in use after digital conversion. If you wanted to avoid running into the projection box every 20 minutes to perform the changeover of reels you'd need the platter system too, and a rather large house.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    ...go see a movie in a theater, ideally where they are projecting from 35mm...
    We don't often see motion pictures in theaters. In fact, we hardly watch them at home. However, being a harsh critic of what's available is another topic.

    Today I checked the listings for "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," one feature we do intend to view early next week. There were two theater chains to choose from. The first has a 6-screen facility very near our home. I phoned and asked whether they projected film or digitally. The answer was "all digital." I expressed my disappointment and intent to go elsewhere, whereupon the manager stated that they still had two film projectors in reserve and could accommodate me. No matter how hard I tried, it was impossible to make him understand that I was a potential patron, not a distributor trying to place a film.

    My second call was to an 8-screen theater, slightly further away, that's part of a different chain. Its manager responded that projection was 100% film. I thanked her, then asked that she let the owners know this answer was a good one and the reason I'd be going to their establishment rather than the competition's. She sounded pleased and committed to pass my input along.

  9. #19
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    Prints are in danger. Masters or in-camera stock is still widely 35mm though.

    However in my opinion cinema has been on the decline in general, film or not. There may or may not be a connection.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #20
    fotch's Avatar
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    I can see digital at home, I would only go out to see a live play or a film movie. I added to the petition.
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