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  1. #61
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Is APS totally dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Guess I'm lucky, one of mine does. The Minolta Dimage Scan Multi with APS Adapter AD-100... (I bought it before joining APUG, it sits gathering time)...

    Last Saturday I stopped by my local camera store and they had a few APS cartridges on the shelf. Almost grabbed them. I was on a mission though, so I picked up some chems and 35mm 100 TMAX instead...
    Can I have it? Lol! I'll adapt it for my new epsonv750


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #62
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Is APS totally dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    The tiny Elph's were pretty darned cool. And they look just like digital P&S cameras. I thought of picking up one just so I could shoot film incognito.
    I like that idea, I also like the idea shooting with APX film a fine art pice with Profoto lighting equipment, some pocket wizards, and a hot model.

    Just to be different.


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #63
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I have seen a tremendously clear and detailed 4x5 foot poster printed from a disc negative.

    Of course, it was done in Rochester to be used by senior Kodak management as part of a retirement party honouring a Kodak Canada employee who was:

    1) known for many years as "Mr. Kodak" throughout the western half of Canada, because he was the only Kodak representative in that half of our country; and
    2) forced to retire just a few month's short of his 50th anniversary with the company, due to Kodak Canada's mandatory retirement at age 65 rule (do the math ).

    As I understand it, much of the tremendous improvement we saw in films in the last 1/4 of the 20th century occurred because of the work done to make 110, disc and APS film viable.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #64
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Matt;

    Thank you.

    For part of that time, I shared an office with that team. Jim and Lee, the leaders of the film and chemical team still meet for lunch after all of that time. Yes, lots of work was done to improve films.

    PE

  5. #65
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Is APS totally dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I have seen a tremendously clear and detailed 4x5 foot poster printed from a disc negative.

    Of course, it was done in Rochester to be used by senior Kodak management as part of a retirement party honouring a Kodak Canada employee who was:

    1) known for many years as "Mr. Kodak" throughout the western half of Canada, because he was the only Kodak representative in that half of our country; and
    2) forced to retire just a few month's short of his 50th anniversary with the company, due to Kodak Canada's mandatory retirement at age 65 rule (do the math ).

    As I understand it, much of the tremendous improvement we saw in films in the last 1/4 of the 20th century occurred because of the work done to make 110, disc and APS film viable.
    He started working at 15/16? Is that the legal age in Canada?


    ~Stone

    The Important Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #66
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Might've been back then...

  7. #67
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Yep, he started just after he turned 15.

    His early road trips involved a Ford Model A
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #68
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    A few points are missed here......

    I have made 16x20 and 20x24 prints from 35mm color negatives.
    I have had a few poster size prints made from 35mm Negatives, One for a Ricoh Af-5 that My father used. the prints look marvelous. the APS emusion was no doubt just as good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    As for film formats, I do not deny that Kodak introduced a host of film formats.
    For years Kodak was in a position to inntroduce new formats where they thought there was an advantage to do so, and I do mean a customer advantage. APS cartriges wre smaller than 35 for a reason, they cameras could be made smaller! A Kinica AA-35 is the thinest cameera that you can do with 35mm, I used one as my Carry Camera for years as it fit my pocket. The APS cartrige would have allowed an even thiner camera. The AA-35 is almost as thin as a Disk camera, but the format and the small negative (Alowing a small lens) were all about making a thin camera.

    The change over was of course also a profitable enterprise for Kodak's Photofinisher sales departmnet as it proably sold new equipment, - mind you they often made updates for existing units which would have had a higher engineering cost per unit sold if it was an update for a machine taht was no longer made.


    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    As for producing some of the formats today, this would take a lot of equipment that just does not exist. In addition, at least 126 required an extra step in preparation in which the entire strip of film was flashed to form frames around the sites where the image was to be placed on exposure.
    The "Orca 110" B&W has this step, although not in teh same format are the other makers film. Someone building low voulme tooling to make 126 or 110 could proably do this step with a regsiter contact printing frame after the film was perforated. And that can proably be done with the film flat on a set up with multiple punches, the holes do not have to be made with the same sort of spacing precison as for movie film.

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    but our children loved those cameras and carried them everywhere. They took a lot of photos, and they told us that their friends loved them.
    And those kids are now using cell phones and thin compact digitals, I hate to admiot (here especially) that a Nikon Coolpix is now part of the items taht sometimes travel with me, it is Precisly because it is the size of the disk camera, and the shots I take with it are for quick sharing, rather than as long term images.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  9. #69
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    Someone building low voulme tooling to make 126 or 110 could proably do this step with a regsiter contact printing frame after the film was perforated. And that can proably be done with the film flat on a set up with multiple punches, the holes do not have to be made with the same sort of spacing precison as for movie film..
    Forgot to add, that although I can see where the pre-flashed borders would help large volume photfinishers in keeping the process in control, anyone (HI SIMON, Hi ADOX) who wnated to make a viable 126 or 110 film could omit that step without causing serious issues with either home or commercial processing given the low volume compaired to 35mm going through the machines.

    Low volume APS is of course more dificult as it requires the thin film base and the clear magnetic coating on the back to be sure it will work with many existing cameras. Ad lets face it there are many more 126 and 110 cameras out there than there were APS cameras ever made.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  10. #70
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Is APS totally dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    Forgot to add, that although I can see where the pre-flashed borders would help large volume photfinishers in keeping the process in control, anyone (HI SIMON, Hi ADOX) who wnated to make a viable 126 or 110 film could omit that step without causing serious issues with either home or commercial processing given the low volume compaired to 35mm going through the machines.

    Low volume APS is of course more dificult as it requires the thin film base and the clear magnetic coating on the back to be sure it will work with many existing cameras. Ad lets face it there are many more 126 and 110 cameras out there than there were APS cameras ever made.
    Yea but canon didn't make any EOS mount 126's... They did an APX, it's really fun, like shooting with a Sony NEX with a 70-200 L series lens, it's ridiculously silly and fun.

    I actually haven't seen a 126 in a while.


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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