Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,719   Posts: 1,514,857   Online: 904
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,801
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Wouldn't a panchromatic film and a blue or cyan filter accomplish more or less the same thing?
    Not in my experience.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  2. #12
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Not in my experience.
    Agreed.
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  3. #13
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,531
    Images
    10
    Care to explain? There shouldn't be much difference whether a film is insensitive to red light or a filter absorbs it, yes?

    Up until now I saw the main motivation for orthochromatic film in the fact that it can be manipulated while dark room safe lights are on, but I'm ready to learn ....
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  4. #14
    kintatsu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bavaria, Germany
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    348
    Images
    2
    Using a 44 or 44A filter will give the same look as traditional ortho film. Traditional ortho stops recording at approximately 580nm, and at that wavelength the 44 transmits o% and the 44a transmits .1% of the light hitting the filter. That's from the Transmission of Wratten Filters pub by Kodak. It means you'll need to increase your exposure by 1-2 stops, depending on the wavelengths being photographed.

    That will give you a more traditional look when developed for your style than if you try a new film and have to relearn its properties, wasting several shots in the process.

  5. #15
    viridari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina [USA]
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    330
    Images
    22
    The silver structure is different for ortho films because it does not need to be sensitized to red spectrum light. The contrast filter may simulate some of the tonality (which, even then, is up for debate) but will do nothing to change the grain structure.

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,996
    Images
    60
    And the results you obtain when you try to develop the film under a red safe-light would most likely also disappoint.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,038
    Images
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Wouldn't a panchromatic film and a blue or cyan filter accomplish more or less the same thing?
    Matt beat me to it, but I was going to say do you like processing in total darkness.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #18
    kintatsu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bavaria, Germany
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    348
    Images
    2
    Safelights other than a very very dim green, and then for short times are still not good for pan films.

    As far as the filter for the effect, if I recall correctly, Ansel Adams recommended the 44A to simulate the old ortho film look and feel with most pan films and the 47 for blue only in his book The Negative. It would seem, at least to me, that his recommendation would be valid. Even though the sensitivity to red exists, if the light doesn't, then nothing would be recorded where it was red. As the red sensitizing is accomplished by adding an agent to the emulsion, the grains remain unchanged either way. At least, that's my understanding.

    I apologize if I'm misleading anyone, and if I'm wrong, I hope that someone can set me straight.

  9. #19
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,531
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by viridari View Post
    The silver structure is different for ortho films because it does not need to be sensitized to red spectrum light.
    Whether a film is orthochromatic or panchromatic has nothing to do with Silver Halide crystals and everything to do with sensitizing dyes. The only time you see these sensitizing dyes in your negatives is if you don't fix&wash certain Kodak films well.
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    And the results you obtain when you try to develop the film under a red safe-light would most likely also disappoint.
    If I remember correctly, orthochromatic film is used to these days for masking where it helps tremendously if you can see what you do without IR goggles.

    Next!
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Matt beat me to it, but I was going to say do you like processing in total darkness.
    I normally do but there are situations where I don't.

    Next!
    Quote Originally Posted by kintatsu View Post
    Safelights other than a very very dim green, and then for short times are still not good for pan films.
    Did you mean orthochromatic films? And why would you use green safelights for orthochromatic film? Michael R. apparently uses a dim red safelight with success.


    Jesus, what a thread ...
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  10. #20
    kintatsu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bavaria, Germany
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    348
    Images
    2
    Did you mean orthochromatic films? And why would you use green safelights for orthochromatic film?
    I thought I said for pan films, but it turns out I only mentioned it not being good for them. Sorry for not being clear, I often have that habit.

    Actually, using an incredibly dim green light allows for short adjustment times for the eye, which allows for rapid inspection of pan films to check development. Green light for ortho would be bad indeed.

    For ortho, red is good, and for the old blue only films, a green light was used as the eye adapts quicker to green. Of course, for pan films, the distance, time, and brightness are all factors. Developing by inspection is definitely not worth the effort except for the most difficult of negatives, at least for me. Accurately judging densities in the dark is too tricky for me.

    Plus, the heightened sense of anticipation in the dark is quite rewarding when you finish without peeking!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin