Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,940   Posts: 1,585,686   Online: 990
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 53
  1. #11
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,214
    I was going to ask WTH a "laser print" was if not just lasers exposing conventional chromogenic print material.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,558
    Images
    65
    There is the Dye Transfer forum on Yahoo. It is run by Jim Browning and has members such as Ctein and many others interested in DT. One of them should be able to answer your question Steve.

    PE

  3. #13
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,483
    Images
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvmycam View Post
    I would not want a dye transfer. Very expensive and they can fade like hell. Transfers are the Worst color imaging media I've tested for fading. Beautiful color, but dye stability is terrible. (They have good dark storage stability.) Inkjets are the best for overall image IQ and stability.

    Cibachrome are the best for stability and will beat an inkjet, but have poor contrast adjustments. Ink jets are behind Ciba, but ahead of Fuji Crystal Archive for stability. Laser prints are above inkjet for stability and maybe(?) equal to Cibacrhome for stability, (but not sure about the last statement. i was never able to test this one area.) I think inkjets are better than Lasers for IQ, but I have not tested all options

    OP...after you study up your DT options, let us know what is going on with them for costs.
    what? you're full of it.
    how does this contribute to the op's question?
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  4. #14
    MDR
    MDR is offline
    MDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,164
    Mr. Iluvmycam never read so much BS in my life most Inkjet prints have the longevity of a gnat that is except for pigment inkjets. The tests by Nelson etc... are a joke in my opinion one can speak about the longevity of a medium if it actually survives that long not trough artificial test that mostly serve as marketing tools. But that's just my opinion and the opinion of many archivists and conservators. If I would want ultra longevity I would make a three colour gum or or three color pigment print now these mediums really have what I would call longevity but an inkjet print pfft (except pigment based ones and even then not every pigment is really lightfast or has any kind of longevity). If also seen quiet a few 60 to 70 year old Dye transfers that looked just as good as the day they were made and maybe you should visit the national portrait gallery and take a look at Madame Yevonde Dye Transfers from the 1930's these still look superb so much for Dye transfer lack of longevity which I agree is not the best there is but is still quiet good. The most beautiful colour process is the three color carbro print but again that's just my opinion.

  5. #15
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,384
    Images
    174
    DREW WILEY May I Private Message you?

    PHOTO ENGINEER Thank you.

    And as for those who mentioned the archival nature of dye transfer process. I have seen samples printed in the 1970's which look like they were done today....Like all materials its simply how its cared for.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  6. #16
    MDR
    MDR is offline
    MDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,164
    Like all materials its simply how its cared for Stephen Frizza

    +1000

    Truer words were never spoken

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,820
    In reply to Mr. Mainecatasbigasadrafthorse : Ciba had to be routinely masked not only for contrast but for color reproduction errors. If one wanted to master Ciba, being comfortable making masks was vital. Basically, you used masking to bludgeon the medium into submission. Masking for dye transfer work is generally even more involved, but is mainly related to balancing all the different separation negs, matrices, and dyes to
    one another (an oversimplified explanation). Supplementary silver masking with current color neg films printed onto RA4 papers is optional and
    more like power steering - just a little goes a long ways. I find myself making either simple mild contrast decrease or contrast increase masks
    for about 30% of my color negs. It's kinda like having the variable contrast option with black and white, and at this point in time is capable
    of dramatically improving the rendition of color neg images when the basic orange mask isn't dead-on in terms of magnification ratio or
    contrast-related color saturation. It's a very valuable tool to have, though a lot of color neg printing can obviously be done without it.
    But at the moment I am routinely making RA4 prints with just as much snap as Ciba, and better hue reproduction. But the inkjet and consumer electronics propaganda machine seems to have convinced everyone that this is impossible. After all, how can it be true if it's
    actually cheaper and faster?

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,820
    Ron - Ctein worked exclusively with pan matrix film, a very different animal from ordinary dye printing from chromes. He was running low on
    Kodak paper, and getting tired of the process anyway, so decided on a permanent change of scenery. So that spells the end of pan matrix
    printing period, unless someone manages a few more images with his leftovers. I bought up the last big lot of Efke matrix film that Jim B. had formulated. Egbert and Bettina over in Germany have since switched from it to a different matrix film as well as a new dye set better geared
    to their hybrid workflow, and sufficient to allow them to operate a custom lab for clients too; but I don't know if they have a reserve of materials allowing resale to other potential printers. I'm trying to find wiggle room in my own lab to squeeze in another 8x10 enlarger dedicated to DT work, so I don't have to interrupt my ordinary RA4 printing needs. But it's just a matter of logistics (don't want to tweak my
    back manhandling that thing just before I leave for another backpacking trip!).

  9. #19
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,196
    Images
    6
    Lots of great info here! My next question is how many prints those matrix films good for?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,820
    Mr. Myittbittyspottedfrontporchcatchasesawaythathugeco oncatdownthestreet: Wish I knew the question to that myself. Matrices pick up dirt or specks of gelatin and wear out eventually, so when they get old don't perform as well. Older matrices which are reconstituted also generallyneed some tweaking of the dyes to get them to perform like they did before. I've heard of people making well over a hundred prints with a set of them, but I've also seen a lot of sloppy looking production dye prints. But in my case I'm really trying create a modernization of the wash-off relief technique, which post-hardens the matrices rather than using a tanning developer (I have several practical reasons for
    preferring this method), and nobody seems to know if there is any pro or con to this which might affect matrice film longevity. But I just can't
    see myself making a lot of prints of any single image anyway. The dye transfer process was geared to limited edition printing ... that's about
    all I can say. You might query over on the Dye Transfer Forum where there are still a couple of folks tuning in who ran commercial DT labs
    back in days of yore.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin