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  1. #91
    AgX
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    Correcting at printing would be the least best option.


    Whether one uses colour correcting filters or tungstem/senstized film, the issue of matching the exposure setting and the light source would remain.
    For printing that would be sufficient. For transparencies additional colour compensating filters may be used.

  2. #92
    Zedwardson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Yup looks like T500 in C-41...
    Hey, I like that look for night shots...

  3. #93

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    Maybe it's just me here, and I admit I am somewhat of a wuss when it comes to trying new things sometimes, but all I can think of is PE's warnings about using ECN-2 film and C-41 processing. When I was a teen, I was burned by the Seattle Filmworks "free film" and charging a fortune for developing scam. So between those two things, I am really hesitant to try it. It just seems too good to be true.

  4. #94
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    I have some of that "free film" too and the slides made from it!

    PE

  5. #95
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    I looked up that section in Post Exposure. Ctein gives the theory explaining what I saw in practice when I used to print color - with prints from slides you can get the midtones adjusted pretty well (which was often satisfactory enough for low light work, not always but often) at the expense of crossover in the shadows and, especially, highlights, while with color negative film the problem is much less severe. The crossover is mainly seen in deep shadows. He explains that you can reduce this by overexposing and I learned back in those days to rather routinely over expose color neg a bit anyway, light permitting.

    The relevant section is on pages 21-22.

    For available light work such photos tend to be high contrast with deep shadows anyway and if you print them dark enough it might not be noticed. If there's plenty of light, of course just use the appropriate filter.

  6. #96

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    I haven't read the whole thread, but one question that has been raised concerns stability if processed in C-41 chemistry. I went to the web page of the company and found this in the FAQ:

    Q: What is the shelf-life & archivability of CineStill Film processed in C-41 chemistry?
    A: Unexposed CineStill film should be stored in the fridge if it will be shot within 6 months or frozen it will be stored longer before shooting. Processed films should remain in a cool, dark place. C-41 process uses some of the most archival chemicals available for photo processing today. There have been no scientific tests for the dye stability of ECN film cross-processed in C-41 but from our tests on film processed four years ago there is no color degradation or fogging of the magenta dye layer.


    It sounds like the stability issue is not entirely settled, but it might not be too bad.

    Perhaps Photo Engineer might be able to comment further.

  7. #97
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    In an engineering sense, there are two ways to confirm stability and lifetimes of anything, not just film.

    1: the most accurate but slowest feedback-loop, is called 'Wait and see'. That's how we know Daguerrotypes etc last for 100+ years, but it's kinda hard to go back to the 1800s with results.

    2: more realistically, there is 'accelerated aging'. For mechanical things like dishwashers, you can make a machine that will open and close the door hundreds and thousands of times, count how many times it was opened before it broke, then figure out how many years of 'real' use that relates to. For chemicals and film, that's kinda hard. OK, for slides you can project them and see how long it takes for them to die under light. But how do you accelerate time in an archival sleeve? With temperature? Maybe something dies after 2 weeks at 60C, does that mean it will last 2 years or 20 years at 20C? With chemicals? Say the normal atmospheric concentration of a certain chemical is 100ppm. Expose the film to 10,000ppm and it lasts 3 days, does that mean it will last 300 days at 100ppm? Maybe the film responds to chemical concentration exponentially or only above a threshold?

    In short, there's a whole lot of engineering knowledge that goes into this sort of thing that I can only scratch the surface on (I'm an electronic engineer, not chemical).
    Places like Kodak spent thousands of man-years and dollars researching these things, and they've probably got a whole lot of answers too (waits for PE to respond).
    But places like Cinestil are not manufacturing engineers and probably don't know what chemicals are in the original film. They're only taking someone else's product and removing the remjet and do not have those resources, so they're stuck with method 1 unfortunately.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  8. #98
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    At Kodak, we used 2000 and 4000 hours of SANS which is an acronym for high intensity daylight, way beyond what you can look at without good filters.

    We also used hot dry air and hot wet air in cabinets.

    These were used to cross compare dye sets of couplers vs developing agents to pick the best matches for stability. Of course, hue was also a major factor even before the light and heat tests.

    It seems that CD3 and CD4 form dyes with different hue due to polarity. These dyes are oriented in a different fashion in the film. It also seems that they don't match up for image stability in the heat and light tests. They are not a disaster, but they don't match up. And so, you get mixed dye hue and dye stability when cross processing these two films.

    Of course, a lot of problems were fixed, such as a magenta fade problem which allowed EK to eliminate the formalin in the process, and further changes made big strides in overall stability. The bottom line is that these two films were not designed for cross processing and no other film is either. What you see is what you get. What you get in the future is problematic.

    PE

  9. #99
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  10. #100
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    Over the years, production for cine film has reduced but we got hold of material to produce 4000 rolls. So get ready to experience the cinematic art of the last century with this special, limited-stock emulsion! Don’t miss the chance to shoot supremely artistic masterpieces with Lomography Cine200 Tungsten Film.
    Or, translated, that means "We bought two 1000' cans and loaded them into 35mm canisters". A few 1000' cans are hardly going to diminish the worldwide supply too much, something tells me that it'll be back as another "limited edition" every year or so, to keep the prices up...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

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