Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,649   Posts: 1,623,492   Online: 951
      
Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 567891011
Results 101 to 109 of 109
  1. #101
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,227
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    Or, translated, that means "We bought two 1000' cans and loaded them into 35mm canisters". A few 1000' cans are hardly going to diminish the worldwide supply too much, something tells me that it'll be back as another "limited edition" every year or so, to keep the prices up...
    well 4000 rolls at 5.5 ft each would take 22 1000ft cans. (assuming that they are 36 exposure rolls.)

    Perhaps the cinestill guys got a few 200T short ends in their last batch of film....

    BTW, I was a great fan of using ECN film back in the days when there were many suppliers who would provide it. Here in Canada there was a place called C+L labs in Richmond hill. Biggest in the states were Dale Labs in Florida and RGB in Hollywood. These labs would run the film in real ECN-2 Process and print on mostly eastman colour print, although some used Fuji or Agfa Print film. I even shot a bit of AGFA XT Negative which was AGFA's Movie Negative.

    Looking at them now, some of the early ones have bad fading in the slides as the Kodak stock at the time was made with the assumption that it only had to last a year in the Theatre circuit. But then the LPP stock came out and it has held up.

    I also played with home developing using a mix it yourself chemistry using CD-4. but never too seriously.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  2. #102
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    rAdelaide
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,734
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    well 4000 rolls at 5.5 ft each would take 22 1000ft cans. (assuming that they are 36 exposure rolls.)
    Yeah, I missed a factor somewhere in my mental maths. Still, not many rolls in the grand scheme of things. In fact, the more there are of places like Cinestill and now Lomography who repackage cine film for stills, the more of a market there might be overall.
    Although, from what I'd think about the size and number of the coating lines for Cine film compared to the size of the lines for Ektachrome, they've already killed Ektachrome for being uneconomical so using Cine film for stills is not going to save that market by any means...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  3. #103

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    271
    Resurrecting an old thread, I shot a roll on Cinestill T500 at ISO800 indoor during New Year's Eve in my XPanII. I really like it! I hope the due stability is not an issue :-/

    I am going to try some Cinestill 50 when they are available!


  4. #104

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    422
    Quote Originally Posted by didjiman View Post
    Resurrecting an old thread, I shot a roll on Cinestill T500 at ISO800 indoor during New Year's Eve in my XPanII. I really like it! I hope the due stability is not an issue :-/

    I am going to try some Cinestill 50 when they are available!

    Awesome shot!
    If your worried about dye stability, just make some nice high res scans and a print, thats better than nothing.

  5. #105
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,227
    The Dye stability SHOULD be in the 100 Year club, IF it is processed in ECN-2. Totally unknown if processing in C-41 as the colour developing agent is different.

    At one time the Movie PRINT stock had bad stability, as most movie prints did not live to see their first birthday anyway. BUT movie Negatives are generally kept forever and so that stock always had the best stability that Kodak knew how to make at the time.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  6. #106

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5
    I have processed several hundred feet of Vision III 500T film using both C41 and ECN-2 formulated per Kodak's published method. Scanning the film using a Nikon Coolscan 5000 with Vuescan in raw mode and inverting with Colorneg, resulted in a magenta colour cast in the C-41 case. I found this to be the case with commercial C-41 cross-processing and when I did it myself using Fuji-Hunt chemistry. Processing in the ECN-2 chemistry eliminates this problem. I was able to source all of the specified chemicals with the exception of the anti-fog which I thus ignored with no noticeable fog problems.

    I have experimented with silver retention in this film by bypassing the bleach step. Scans of these negatives compared with the same negatives following a bleach and fix operation leads to a very interesting effect. In general, I prefer the reduced colour saturation from silver retention and typically skip the bleach altogether. The bleach is pH sensitive and does require some adjustment, thus, skipping it makes processing much simpler. Not paying attention to pH results in Prussian Blue formation which contaminates the emulsion.

    Finally, Kodak specifies a replenishment scheme for this film in large scale operations. I found that I could adapt the replenishment operations to my processing of 2 rolls per week with most excellent results on chemical usage and waste minimization.
    Last edited by rexp2; 01-06-2015 at 12:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #107

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,148
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by rexp2 View Post
    I was able to source all of the specified chemicals with the exception of the anti-fog which I thus ignored with no noticeable fog problems.

    That's probably what I'll do too once I get set up for this, but (for the moment at least) you can still get the AF-2000 pretty cheap direct from Kodak. 2 5L containers for $55.25 (plus shipping I assume). Part number is 5160049, call them at (800) 621-FILM (3456)

    Duncan

  8. #108
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    24,096
    Images
    65
    I found the above photo rather low in saturation and the shadows were quite blue.

    PE

  9. #109

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    422
    I know a professional photographer who used Cinestill reguarly and reckons there is no issues with using it in C41 as far as the results come out, of course i would expect there must be some differences in colour shift if processed in the correct ECN2 chemistry, but obviously it cant be much to worry about as lots of photographers are using it and are happy with the results, in addition to this the anti-halation remjet backing is also removed on this film and the results are still sharp and acceptable.

Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 567891011


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin