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  1. #91

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    I'd buy a bulk roll of 61mm film
    - Bill Lynch

  2. #92
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    I could use a bulk roll of 120/220 film to load my homemade MF panorama pinhole camera. It has 8 pinholes, making one single image of 360 degrees on one whole standerd 120 film roll.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  3. #93

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    Rolling your own 220 film

    Hello Noel,

    I have been down the recycled 120 backing paper road too, but found that the edges of the paper became fraid after three or so cycles of reuse; also the adhesive tape affixing "top" and "tail" to the film emulsion tends to wear the paper thin over the area of contact as each cycle removes a finite layer of paper during the "peeling off" process - but it works as you correctly describe; the 120 backing paper from Ilford is a more elegant albeit expensive option; when I know that I will be developing my 220 film soon after exposure, I sometimes dispense with the "tails" and load the film directly from the camera magazine into the tank (in darkness of course); the elimination of the paper "tails" effectively halves the paper costs; the elimination of the paper "tops" is also possible if you want to load your magazines in darkness but does waste a length of emulsion over the length of the missing paper "top" - and you might end up with a film length that is too long for your developing tank spiral. However each to his own tailor made method.

    I have never had a problem with 120 film being scratched by the pressure plate; on well maintained Hasselblad magazines, the film emulsion is always in very light contact with the pressure plate except at the upper and lower extremities of the frame where it is lightly pressed between pressure plate and rollers and during the actual transport cycle when the rollers on the emulsion side should rotate making scratching very unlikely.

    Best wishes,

    Richard Hughes.

  4. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by rdihughes View Post
    Hello Noel,

    I have been down the recycled 120 backing paper road too, but found that the edges of the paper became fraid after three or so cycles of reuse; also the adhesive tape affixing "top" and "tail" to the film emulsion tends to wear the paper thin over the area of contact as each cycle removes a finite layer of paper during the "peeling off" process - but it works as you correctly describe; the 120 backing paper from Ilford is a more elegant albeit expensive option; when I know that I will be developing my 220 film soon after exposure, I sometimes dispense with the "tails" and load the film directly from the camera magazine into the tank (in darkness of course); the elimination of the paper "tails" effectively halves the paper costs; the elimination of the paper "tops" is also possible if you want to load your magazines in darkness but does waste a length of emulsion over the length of the missing paper "top" - and you might end up with a film length that is too long for your developing tank spiral. However each to his own tailor made method.

    I have never had a problem with 120 film being scratched by the pressure plate; on well maintained Hasselblad magazines, the film emulsion is always in very light contact with the pressure plate except at the upper and lower extremities of the frame where it is lightly pressed between pressure plate and rollers and during the actual transport cycle when the rollers on the emulsion side should rotate making scratching very unlikely.

    Best wishes,

    Richard Hughes.
    I just think it's crazy to spend all that time for 220, and money! I bought two rolls of the 70mm non-perf also and no way would I use it to cut down for 220... For 116 sure, but it's not THAT inconvenient to change rolls at 10 frames.

  5. #95

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    Hi Stone

    The inconvenience rather depends on the camera and style of shooting.

    For the RB67 I only have 3 backs and four motor inserts 80 frames with 220 before I need to find shade and reload.

    Five minutes shooting more than five minutes reloading.

    The RB is not a ULF Double dark slide cam you can use it like a DSLR.

    The C330 stops at 20, I don't take hand of the winder.

    Noel

  6. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Hi Stone

    The inconvenience rather depends on the camera and style of shooting.

    For the RB67 I only have 3 backs and four motor inserts 80 frames with 220 before I need to find shade and reload.

    Five minutes shooting more than five minutes reloading.

    The RB is not a ULF Double dark slide cam you can use it like a DSLR.

    The C330 stops at 20, I don't take hand of the winder.

    Noel
    I shot with a model yesterday, I shoot a lot more frames with a person than a landscape, I shot more than I should have, and I only went through 7 rolls of 120, in 3 hours... I wasn't using my RZ67, but my Mamiya 7. So I had to change films each time not just backs, and it was still not a problem.

    Everyone has a different style and way of working, I just can't imagine spending hours cutting down paper and backing just to save the 1 minute it takes to change a roll.

  7. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by rdihughes View Post
    Hello Noel,

    I have been down the recycled 120 backing paper road too, but found that the edges of the paper became fraid after three or so cycles of reuse; also the adhesive tape affixing "top" and "tail" to the film emulsion tends to wear the paper thin over the area of contact as each cycle removes a finite layer of paper during the "peeling off" process - but it works as you correctly describe;

    Richard Hughes.
    HiRichard

    Thanks for kind and useful response.
    My plastic bag for 120 backing paper is a large bin bag, it gets topped up regular.
    So I'd not need to reuse more than once.
    All I need is pressure sensitive tape a sharpie and a jig to assemble lead and trail paper in dark. So

    i) would Ilford supply 100 foot of 61mm in polybag and card box

    ii) and how many people will order/pay

    Ilford may not be happy... how many 100 rolls would we need?

    Best
    Noel

  8. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    HiRichard

    Thanks for kind and useful response.
    My plastic bag for 120 backing paper is a large bin bag, it gets topped up regular.
    So I'd not need to reuse more than once.
    All I need is pressure sensitive tape a sharpie and a jig to assemble lead and trail paper in dark. So

    i) would Ilford supply 100 foot of 61mm in polybag and card box

    ii) and how many people will order/pay

    Ilford may not be happy... how many 100 rolls would we need?

    Best
    Noel
    Ilford cuts their roll film bulk in 50 feet not 100, that probably won't change. So you'll have to double your order

  9. #99

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    Hello Noel,

    this is a reply I got from my dealer in the UK at the end of 2013; my question was directed to which emulsion could be supplied:
    >
    >
    >Hi Richard
    >If I remember right you would like HP5 so that one.
    >Also as the most important customer, you should have your say, is it to
    >be 15 rolls of 90.5m or 30 rolls of 30m.
    >What ever you need and can get others to go along with you is fine with me.
    >Remember the other customer from today would I hope still have 8 rolls @
    >30.5m or maybe I can get them to take 3 rolls of the 90.5m.
    >Just let me no when you are ready, I will ask Harman to get back to me
    >if anybody else is asking about it.


    I have not yet followed it up because I am currently shooting 70mm in a 6 * 4.5 Hasselblad back (no typo folks - a very rare beast indeed).

    If you (and any other users) are interested, I am sure we could organise a bulk order to satisfy minimum order requirements - apparently having nothing to do with the ULF run.

    Seemingly - on the face of it - the information provided by Mr. StoneNYC is not quite correct.

    Best wishes,

    Richard Hughes.

  10. #100

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    Dear All,

    61.5mm cut film is not offered, and it will not be offered as it is a standard roll film size.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / Harman technology limited



 

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