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  1. #11
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    The overwhelming sense I have is that the KA guys haven't figured out that the future of film will be all about micro-manufacturers selling into a tiny niche market, or that they have figured that out and figure they have a year or two or three to milk what they can out of the current product line before moving on to new markets.

    I have a hard time thinking any of the talk about "innovation" has anything to do with film for people like us.
    My sense is that KA's primary goal is to keep its retirees from having to eat dog food. An undeniably noble cause, that. And one I unreservedly and wholeheartedly support.

    But not one, I fear, that they will risk hitching up to the future success of Kodak-branded films. Or any films for that matter.

    The lure, the siren call, the fantasy, of instant digital billions runs extraordinarily deep in the tech industry. Believe me, I've seen it, I know. I could name you all the ugly horror stories that I've seen or been involved with myself.

    That's why my heart sank when I read the new KA CEO's professional background. That same nonsense sank Perez. And took EK down with him.

    What these guys often fail to realize, or just don't care about because it doesn't affect them personally, is that high tech is a winner-take-all game. Either you're the single best, or your out. Musical chairs, but with devastating consequences to the losers.

    I really, really want to see KA succeed. Preferably with a long-term film component. But even without, if necessary. No dog food. But when I read "...from Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google" I just went cold.

    I hope I'm terribly wrong...

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 04-08-2014 at 12:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  2. #12
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    The "Meat" of the alaris Portfolio is the business that allows for the production of photo prints from both digital and film originals and secondly the division that makes document scanners which have more or less supplanted microfilm. (although the Microfilm division was spun off before the bankrupcy so their is not as much business continuity there as you might like to see.)

    not sure who got the business making films for producing Electronic circuit boards, and other products for the electronics industry, perhaps that business fell by the wayside. I know X-ray seems to have been sold out.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  3. #13
    AgX
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    Kodak sold the medical X-Ray busines (including manufacture) long ago. At the printed circuit business Agfa is world market
    leader.

  4. #14
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    My sense is that KA's primary goal is to keep its retirees from having to eat dog food. An undeniably noble cause, that. And one I unreservedly and wholeheartedly support.

    But not one, I fear, that they will risk hitching up to the future success of Kodak-branded films. Or any films for that matter.

    The lure, the siren call, the fantasy, of instant digital billions runs extraordinarily deep in the tech industry. Believe me, I've seen it, I know. I could name you all the ugly horror stories that I've seen or been involved with myself.

    That's why my heart sank when I read the new KA CEO's professional background. That same nonsense sank Perez. And took EK down with him.

    What these guys often fail to realize, or just don't care about because it doesn't affect them personally, is that high tech is a winner-take-all game. Either you're the single best, or your out. Musical chairs, but with devastating consequences to the losers.

    I really, really want to see KA succeed. Preferably with a long-term film component. But even without, if necessary. No dog food. But when I read "...from Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google" I just went cold.

    I hope I'm terribly wrong...

    Ken
    Yes indeed Ken, yet another professional manager in a grey suit who doesn't know an f stop from a bus stop takes the helm of a photographic company, it can only end up one way.
    Ben

  5. #15
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    Yes indeed Ken, yet another professional manager in a grey suit who doesn't know an f stop from a bus stop takes the helm of a photographic company, it can only end up one way.
    I truly believe that when someone asks Simon Galley what his favorite personal darkroom photographic tools and supplies are, and he can immediately answer that question from his own personal experience and also tell you why, it tells the rest of us in an overarching sense a HUGE part about why Harman/Ilford are in the successful position they are right now.

    And my guess is that he's not a management outlier within Harman in that respect.

    One of the most fundamental aspects of succeeding at anything in this world is that you have to really, really want to do it in the first place. And want it for the right reasons. And those reasons do not always boil down solely to "cuz I wanna' get rich real fast..."

    Last evening I almost sent Mr. Gerbershagen a question asking what is his current favorite b&w photo paper in his own darkroom. An intentionally loaded question on two levels. But I didn't.

    I do, however, wonder which other department he would have forwarded that inquiry to...

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    When it went into bankruptcy, Eastman Kodak still had a whole bunch of people on the payroll who had great amounts of experience in and passion for film photography - far more than anybody who might have the necessary skill set for being a successful CEO for a public company in transition.

    If Mr. Gerbershagen is truly a visionary executive and manager, he will be able to take advantage of that.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    When it went into bankruptcy, Eastman Kodak still had a whole bunch of people on the payroll who had great amounts of experience in and passion for film photography - far more than anybody who might have the necessary skill set for being a successful CEO for a public company in transition.
    Yes, they did. But none of them were ever allowed to be in a position to leverage that experience or passion.

    Instead, EK chose an outsider with absolutely no knowledge of, or passion for, the technology that EK had spent over a century perfecting. They got a high tech inkjet printer guy. Whose turn-around strategy bankrupted the entire company. Which threw all of the stakeholders under the bus. And now EK is just another small me-too commercial printing company.

    No surprises there, given the inkjet guy's background.

    But successful? Wasn't the whole point of that public company transition precisely to keep from trashing everyone's investments and then becoming just another small me-too company?

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If Mr. Gerbershagen is truly a visionary executive and manager, he will be able to take advantage of that.
    I hear he's truly visionary in "...Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google..."

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #18
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Yes, they did. But none of them were ever allowed to be in a position to leverage that experience or passion.

    Instead, EK chose an outsider with absolutely no knowledge of, or passion for, the technology that EK had spent over a century perfecting. They got a high tech inkjet printer guy. Whose turn-around strategy bankrupted the entire company. Which threw all of the stakeholders under the bus. And now EK is just another small me-too commercial printing company.

    No surprises there, given the inkjet guy's background.

    But successful? Wasn't the whole point of that public company transition precisely to keep from trashing everyone's investments and then becoming just another small me-too company?



    I hear he's truly visionary in "...Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google..."

    Ken
    "...the google EMPIRE" if I recall correctly....
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #19

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    I truly wonder if these companies (and governments also) don't just walk into the room with the infinite number of monkeys with typewriters, and pick their next executive at random. And if not, perhaps they'd do better if they did.

  10. #20
    eddie's Avatar
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    The guy has had the job for 7 days. People seem to be prematurely labeling him a failure. His bio lists photography as an interest. Maybe (OK- probably not, but so what?) it's film photography. Maybe he collects photography. Maybe he cares about Kodak's history and legacy. Maybe we should wait and see how his leadership pans out, before announcing it a disaster.

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