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  1. #241
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    The only reason prints even exist is because there was not the ability to scan negs, nor was there computer monitors and smart phones at a time in photography's past to display one's work. If there were I sincerely doubt printing would have become that popular and certainly would never have evolved or expanded the way it did. It would likely still exist though as a tiny fraction of the end result of photography, as it is now. I know this is APUG but I will admit I'm a hybrid photographer, I shoot 98% B&W film but scan with my Nikon 4000, 9000 and Leafscan 45. 95% of my images I display only online and maybe only 5% I print. Of the ones I print though I have sold for some for $500+ and have had some in charity auctions go for as much as $900. Nobody would pay that for one of my online scans!
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  2. #242

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Sintchak (rich815) View Post
    The only reason prints even exist is because there was not the ability to scan negs, nor was there computer monitors and smart phones at a time in photography's past to display one's work.
    Quite.

    Photography as it is (along with many if not most of mankind's technological artifacts) is an accident of history.

    There is nothing preordained or necessary about silver-based photography.

    Accordingly there's no need to mystify or make nonsensically sententious claims for it.

  3. #243

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    I look forward to seeing you enjoy or sell your first edition Tolkien loaded on your kindle :

    Sententious....... ? there is nothing preordained or necessary about silver-based photography....?

    In your opinion to which you are most certainly entitled...I would and will disagree until I am no longer
    warm or upright.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  4. #244

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    To be clear, Simon, I am not implying that I consider any remarks of yours I have ever read to be sententious nonsense ... however I have read a few by others here at APUG that were ...

    I'm not at all sure I get what you're saying about Tolkien and Kindles though. I never liked Tolkien and don't have any interest in owning a Kindle.

  5. #245

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    I guess people don't print (or only print 5%) because they feel they need to print big, at least 12x16; 8x10 is just a working print I often read. And to print big one needs to shoot work of art, outstanding images, something stunning, etc. Wrong! I shoot a lot and print small, albums size prints, 4x5, 5x7, even smaller on some ancient Agfa paper. Printing small is a lot less demanding, much cheaper but very rewarding nonetheless!

  6. #246

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    Dear Pdeeh,

    I must be getting over sensitive in my old age !

    I do not like Tolkien either.... it can be Hobbit forming....

    ( an old joke.... but one I always enjoyed ! )

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  7. #247
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    The long post that you just made Simon was a great one! I second your sentiments!!
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  8. #248
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    I'm not at all sure I get what you're saying about Tolkien and Kindles though. I never liked Tolkien and don't have any interest in owning a Kindle.
    The reply was not intended to be all about you...

    Ken
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  9. #249
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    Hear, hear Simon. Good post.

    Another reason why I am sure I will enjoy working with XP2. Although I work hybrid, and enjoy it, I also print the old-fashioned way as well. I always had trouble getting BW400 to print the way I wanted. This is where I expect XP2 to have the edge.

    Though it may be a touch off topic I will throw this out. Three of my grandchildren enjoy analogue photography with me. But it definitely isn't scanning and printing on the printer that they like. The absolutely love being able to go into the darkroom with their negatives and make and develop analogue prints. The magic of seeing the print begin to appear on the paper under the red light is what captured every one of them. If they want to take a picture and send it to a friend, or print it on a printer, they just use their phone. Everyone can do that. But not everyone can bring their very own black and white print to school to show off.

    EDIT - In fact, one of them has already moved to a 6x6 folder because they like the prints better. And Ilford's paper is terrific.
    Dan

    The simplest tools can be the hardest to master.

  10. #250
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    Three of my grandchildren enjoy analogue photography with me. But it definitely isn't scanning and printing on the printer that they like. The absolutely love being able to go into the darkroom with their negatives and make and develop analogue prints. The magic of seeing the print begin to appear on the paper under the red light is what captured every one of them. If they want to take a picture and send it to a friend, or print it on a printer, they just use their phone. Everyone can do that. But not everyone can bring their very own black and white print to school to show off.

    EDIT - In fact, one of them has already moved to a 6x6 folder because they like the prints better. And Ilford's paper is terrific.


    I've told this story before, but when my son was in the 8th grade I was approached by the faculty at his school about teaching a little photo class to a few of the students as a consolation gift. They were the ones who hadn't made it into the annual school play.

    So we made pinhole cameras from unused one-gallon paint cans. We used Ilford paper for the negatives and Ilford paper for the contact positives. I turned the women's faculty restroom into a red-light darkroom with a hanging white bulb, set out trays and washer and timer, the whole nine yards. Had a sturdy DIY paint can tripod adapter, exposure charts, and a stopwatch for the black electrical tape shutters.

    The kids loved it. And mind you these were 7th and 8th grade kids who had just begun learning that all adults must always be avoided at all costs.

    About a week later I was at the school for some reason and one of the faculty members pulled me aside and told me she had watched as one of the girls from the class had spent that entire week walking around the playground and shoving her hands in the other kids faces.

    A little additional investigation had determined that the girl was actually asking the other kids to smell her hands. I had told her after the class ended that the smell of fixer on her hands meant that she had taken her rightful place in a very long line of traditional darkroom photographers stretching back 178 years.

    Apparently she hadn't washed her hands during the entire following week...



    Ken

    [Edit: I just looked and the very simple webpage I made for this class is still available here. It shows the student's final photographs from two sessions. Kirsten was the young lady with the fixer hands. Wow, has it already been almost ten years?]
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 08-30-2014 at 02:09 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added [Edit...]
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932



 

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