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  1. #11
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Michael, since I'm one of those getting the first cameras, come on down and visit Zion. I'm the newbie to ulf guinea pig.
    Non Digital Diva

  2. #12
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    Yeah, I could come down and see the park. It's been a while since I've been. I'm anxious to see how the cameras turn out and what you think of it once it arrives. Being a guinea-pig sometimes has it's advantages.

    Did you ever check on that plate-burner in SLC?

    Later,
    Michael Slade

  3. #13
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    So back to the drawing board and returned to using wood for the main frame and then going with an extension rail/bed that transports seperate from the camera. the rack slides into the main bed and is locked down after the front standard is slid into place. This rack which has a double extension is a hybrid of aluminum and wood, which gives me the stability I have been searching for at maximum extensions.
    Jim,
    Sounds like you may have the rail/bed re-design worked out so maybe this offer is a bit late. However, if you would like, I can do a deflection analysis on the design and give you actual numbers on how much the assembly will deflect when loaded to maximum conditions of rail extension and front/rear standard weights. If it still needs more stiffness, I could give you recommendations on what dimensions or materials to change. The wood/aluminum composite extension rails sounds like a good idea. Have you considered using laminated wood? Its stiffer than solid wood and might be less expensive to fabricate than the composite assembly would be.

    Send me a PM or E-mail if you are interested. The deflection analysis would be done at no charge of course. I will also volunteer to look over a prototype and cast the judgement of my LF photog/practicing engineer/former tool maker and farmboy eyeball on it.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    I'll have to see how far the hinge needs to go up to be able to comfortably remove and insert a piece of film.

    For a changing tent the tape might work better. The film lifts off pretty easily and the tape remains tacky enough to use a couple more times. I Run the tape right along the long sides of the holder in 4 inch pieces and one piece at the top and bottom. Apply pressure gently with a cotton glove being carful to touch only the 1/4-3/8ths of an inch contacting the tape. (the same area that would normally be under the rails in an old style holder).
    As long as you stay on this width with your pressure you will have no marks on the image area of the film. (although gentle pressure with the cotton glove should leave no marks.) This is how I have been working with the holders.

    The nice thing about using the tape is that it allows the use of inserts in a holder so multiple formats can be used without the need to carry additional camera backs. For example, if one had a 12x20 camera, a set of inserts could be used to center 7x17 or 8x20 or 11x14 film in a 12x20 holder. With one camera, one back and 4 holders you could go into the filed and shoot 4 different formats.
    Jim,
    The tape seems like a fine, low tech solution to the problem of keeping the film flat and in place. As David pointed out Sinar utilizes a similar idea in one of their products. Can the film be loaded onto the tape without without removing the dark slide from the holder? If the slide needs to be either removed or pulled out far enough to completely expose the septum it seems to me that it would be cumbersome to load the holder in the field. Perhaps I just can't see past what is conventional in my personal experience, (I never pull the slide more than part way, even on a darkroom counter) but it seems like the combined length of the slide and the holder would pose the same problem on the horizontal plane as the frame would in the vertical. I have loaded conventional holders (Korona and Hoffmann) in a Harrison tent and while it is a mildly character building experience changing film in a tent seems like the most practical solution to having only a few holders available.
    Celac.

  5. #15
    janvanhove's Avatar
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    Jim,

    I just wanted to express my admiration and respect for this whole undertaking and the way you have been hadling things so far. Hang in there, I'm sure the result will be worth it!

    Cheers,

    PJ
    Patrick Jan Van Hove
    "The heart and mind are the true lens of the camera"
    Mamut Photo, The Ultra-Large-Format photography homepage

  6. #16
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    Jim
    great post and nice of you to keep everyone updated.
    like always I really look forward to eventually buying one.

  7. #17

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    Will carbon fiber be used?

  8. #18
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    Thanks for the update Jim. I was looking for it in the Large Format section. Glad to see you stick with it. There are those of use interested so keep up the persistence. It's actually good news (I "need" to wait LOL).
    I currently have a Canham 8X10 lightweight. It sounds like you have gone with a similar design with the bed/rail. It seems most of the weigh is in the rear standard/back. I could always upgrade to the Canham 7X17 back but it's a bit pricey
    I wonder if your design would easily integrate with my current bed/rail?
    Thanks again

  9. #19
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    Jim,

    This is a huge project. It can be difficult to juggle something like this with a family and day job. Keep on keeping on.

    Alan.

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