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  1. #21
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Shively
    There's still pay phones? Where? I can never find one of them. That's why I'm paying $50 a month to make two or three calls. (I was never good with economics.)

    I did see a recent ad for a new Smith-Corona. Could hardly believe it.
    Detroit has many pay phones, often with a line of 2 or 3 people waiting to use them. Most cities large and small allowed the telco's to let the phones waste away -- to become eye sores. I suspect that the pay phones in detroit are still making money -- oddly they are mostly intact.

    *

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Arrogant or not, why dont you go to the mall and look at the next generation and see them walking around with Ipods, cell phones, etc. These are the people who will be making pictures and are comfortable with technology. The price of these items decreases as time goes by. A palm PDA used to be many hundred dollars when they first came out, now you can get a Palm Treo on Ebay for $70 dollars.
    <shrug> I'm pretty comfortable with technology: I have a cell phone and an iPod. My two Tivo's are wirelessly networked to eachother so I can move my son's favorite episode of Sesame Street (American Fruit Stand, if anyone is curious) between the living room and the play room. I have a FreeBSD box in a colocation facility running mailman for a mailing list I maintain. I build my tools from source and I edit my own DNS zone files. I'm even the Director of Operations for an Internet company with responsibility for a couple of thousand servers in multiple data centers.

    I also contact print 8x10, b&w.

    One of the reasons I picked a fundamentally 19th century hobby is precisely because of what I do for a living. At the end of the day, or on the weekend, the very last thing I want to do is spend more time with computers. I like wet darkroom work because it's hands on, low tech. Technology comfort and technology fatigue are not mutually exclusive.

    Dean

  3. #23

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    You and Jovo are missing the point entirely. The cash revenue for camera and film manufacturers is the guy who buys a point and shoot to take pics of his/her kids, etc, etc. When the all inclusive gizmo has enough resolution so that the person can take the pic, beam it to Costo and pick it up 30 minutes later, point and shoot cameras will be useless. This is why Kodak and Fuji are sufffering so much, the counted on China to be a big film consumer and it turned out they took to digital instead.

    As an 8x10 shooter, you dont count. Your film purchase is nothing, hell the LF film purchase from B&H or Badger is nothing compared to the revenues 35 mm film and printing and the purchases made by Wal Mart or other chain stores brought in revenues to Kodak or Fuji.

    Bottom line, there are more people using point and shoots than there are people using 8x10 cameras, technology fatigue or not......

    Quote Originally Posted by DeanC
    <shrug> I'm pretty comfortable with technology: I have a cell phone and an iPod. My two Tivo's are wirelessly networked to eachother so I can move my son's favorite episode of Sesame Street (American Fruit Stand, if anyone is curious) between the living room and the play room. I have a FreeBSD box in a colocation facility running mailman for a mailing list I maintain. I build my tools from source and I edit my own DNS zone files. I'm even the Director of Operations for an Internet company with responsibility for a couple of thousand servers in multiple data centers.

    I also contact print 8x10, b&w.

    One of the reasons I picked a fundamentally 19th century hobby is precisely because of what I do for a living. At the end of the day, or on the weekend, the very last thing I want to do is spend more time with computers. I like wet darkroom work because it's hands on, low tech. Technology comfort and technology fatigue are not mutually exclusive.

    Dean

  4. #24
    jovo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Arrogant or not, why dont you go to the mall and look at the next generation and see them walking around with Ipods, cell phones, etc. These are the people who will be making pictures and are comfortable with technology. The price of these items decreases as time goes by. A palm PDA used to be many hundred dollars when they first came out, now you can get a Palm Treo on Ebay for $70 dollars.

    It is more arrogant to think everybody likes what you like and cannot afford the gizmos.

    You're absolutely right about what you just wrote, and I don't disagree. My point about arrogance (and I don't mean arrogance on your part if there is any, but the arrogance of the technomasters of the universe who think that everyone will like what they like!) is the assertion that EVERYONE will be doing what you describe. (BTW, not everyone even has $70 to spend on what they can also accomplish in more traditional ways.) People still write snail mail and always will when they can perfume a piece of paper for their sweetheart for instance. You can splash perfume on your monitor and keyboard til the bottle's empty, but only you will know about it (plus the neighbors I guess.). That the use and commonality of technoinventions is on the ascendence isn't an issue for me. It's the notion that it will continue in the same way forever that I dispute. I assert the swing of the pendulum.
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  5. #25

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    I saw a funny "New Yorker" cartoon;

    It shows a guy talking on a cell phone and saying to the person on the other end;

    "Hold on a sec, I just took another picture of my ear."


    Too many functions, with few done well.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Early Riser
    I saw a funny "New Yorker" cartoon;

    It shows a guy talking on a cell phone and saying to the person on the other end;

    "Hold on a sec, I just took another picture of my ear."


    Too many functions, with few done well.
    This is a great example of the generational transition, I finally broke down and bought a cell phone, mainly to keep in touch with my GF and mom. Took me 2 days to learn how to use the damn thing. My GF's 12 year old son took it and started playing with it right away, putting ring tones, and god knows what else....I am hoping I dont get a $2000 cell phone bill...

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    ...The cash revenue for camera and film manufacturers is the guy who buys a point and shoot to take pics of his/her kids, etc, etc. When the all inclusive gizmo has enough resolution so that the person can take the pic, beam it to Costo and pick it up 30 minutes later......
    There will be very few photographs printed at this stage (my guess is 3-5 years) as they tend to be transient things (even pics of the kids get lost in shoeboxes etc) so the pics that are unwanted will be deleted whilst treasured pics will be archived to some as yet unheard of storage medium. I believe the sub $/£/euro 500 market is the one that is ultimately doomed.
    Film will continue as a hobbyist medium, just like painting is today.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by digiconvert
    I believe the sub $/£/euro 500 market is the one that is ultimately doomed.
    Film will continue as a hobbyist medium, just like painting is today.
    I'd say hobby/fine art, but think you're exactly correct otherwise. Film won't disappear, but it'll be a niche market going forward.

    Dean

  9. #29

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    A New York Times article has some interesting observations on future trends for cameras. How about the GPS location caption for your images ;-) One interesting trend is demise of digital still photography in favor of movie clips. The related trend is digital gear is finally shedding its copying of still cameras.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  10. #30
    digiconvert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    A New York Times article ,,,
    Some interesting comments on this which probably show why cameras as WE know them are doomed apart from for serious users,

    'Yet digital S.L.R.'s are big, bulky and heavy. And you can't use the screen to compose your shots, which, on other cameras, is a delicious convenience. You must frame your shots by peering through the eyepiece.' Has anyone here ever tried to compose a picture in a 2 inch screen held at arms length ? This is progress ?

    'The P1 from Nikon and [color=#000066]Elph[/color] SD430 from Canon both offer [color=#000066]Wi-Fi[/color] wireless networking. Unfortunately, the only thing those cameras can do is transfer your pictures wirelessly to a computer or printer; they don't connect to the Internet.' And this is a problem because .... ?

    'The EasyShare-One from Kodak, however, can send your photos by e-mail or post them on a free Kodak Web page — or even go the opposite direction, summoning photos from your online stash to the camera's screen on demand.' Bye bye one hour labs for DIGITAL

    Then the killer quote,

    'THE NEXT-GEN CAMERA Paradise is still not in the cards; for one thing, nobody has yet figured out how to store all those digital photos for future generations. It's not clear how long hard drives and home-burned CD's can last, and the software question is even more frightening. Will the under-the-skin nanocomputers of 2100 still recognize JPEG files?'

    Providing someone somewhere is making photographic paper and chemicals you will still be able to take a 50 year old negative and develop it to produce a print which will last at least 50 years (100 for BW).

    Isn't progress wondeful ? Makes me feel glad I chose film .

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