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  1. #21

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    That facility handled lower end films for mainstream markets. Most of it was packaged for people like Walmart. With thier packaging. I think even Ritz got thier film packaged there.(It's been a while since we visited the facility so I could be wrong) I don't think it will have any impact on pro films. It is a great and totally modern facility. Took up a huge piece of land and even had its own hotel for its visiters. It is a shame but enevitable.
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  2. #22

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    Ron,

    So why is it that Fuji decided to build such a large compex in South Carolina?

    Or why did BMW put a huge auto manufacturing plant near Greer, SC.?

    The plain fact of the matter is that labor is cheaper in South Carolina than it is in many parts of Japan and Germany.

    What else but cheaper labor could explain the huge Nissan plant north of Jackson, Mississippi, or the Mercedes plant in Alabama?

    Sandy



    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Labor in Japan is incredibly cheap compared to the USA, but expensive compared to China and other Asian countries.

    That is one reason why Fuji wanted to build in China.

    PE

  3. #23
    digiconvert's Avatar
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    Is this one for the 'doom and gloom' forum ?
    To paraphrase Henry Ford 'If you think Film is dying or you think film has a future, you're probably right'.
    -Stocking up on film might lead to it's death once the inventory levels reach a point where purchasing almost ceases.
    -Telling everyone that film is dying will make them believe you.
    -Using AND purchasing film is the only way to persuade the manufacturers that it make sense to keep making it.

    Film is probably already dead as a mass market consumer product (mass market cameras (any medium) are also probably doomed , see the threads about the Kodak CEO's vision for image capture devices) . Film is aloso dead as a mainstream medium for commercial/professional photography given the way that digital capture fits into modern ICT based publishing systems and the public's expectation of results in an instant.
    Film cannot be replaced as a medium for expressive B&W, it also provides the raw material for darkroom work. In other words film's future is as an image capture medium for hobbyists and fine art printers. Let's celebrate this and stop doom saying.

    Sorry if I ruffle some feathers (particularly the bit about film being moribund in some areas) but this is a discussion forum >

  4. #24

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    Dear Jnanian,

    What was the name of that company at the Old Quonset Point Navy Base in RI
    ?

    Thanks Simon.

  5. #25

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    No import tax comes to mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Ron,

    So why is it that Fuji decided to build such a large compex in South Carolina?

    Or why did BMW put a huge auto manufacturing plant near Greer, SC.?

    The plain fact of the matter is that labor is cheaper in South Carolina than it is in many parts of Japan and Germany.

    What else but cheaper labor could explain the huge Nissan plant north of Jackson, Mississippi, or the Mercedes plant in Alabama?

    Sandy
    art is about managing compromise

  6. #26
    eclarke's Avatar
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    "-Stocking up on film might lead to it's death once the inventory levels reach a point where purchasing almost ceases.
    -Telling everyone that film is dying will make them believe you.
    -Using AND purchasing film is the only way to persuade the manufacturers that it make sense to keep making it."

    Kodak, Ilford and Fuji have the combined annual capaity of a BILLION SQUARE YARDS of coating. All 10,497 members of APUG can put all the film they want in freezers and it will not have an impact on these companies, they are BIG business..EC

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley
    Dear Jnanian,

    What was the name of that company at the Old Quonset Point Navy Base in RI
    ?

    Thanks Simon.

    simon

    it is a company called toray - a gigantic japanese firm -- they are pretty diverse - bathings suites to battery acid, building materials to plastic film

    http://www.toray.com/globalnetwork/html/glo_a400.html

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by digiconvert
    In other words film's future is as an image capture medium for hobbyists and fine art printers. >
    I think that’s a right assessment of the situation. With time this population may vary in size but there will always be people wanting to jump into the darkroom. As somebody mentioned in this forum, downsizing is the order of the day. But remember that there’re smalls companies out there that may actually benefit from the dismiss of the big guys. I don’t have the experience to say that those products are as good as Kodak or Fuji though.

  9. #29
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    My take on this whole situation is that, like everything else, things change and you have to move on. Yeah, ACROS 100 is my favorite film, but if it does get discontinued, I won't be happy about it, but I'll find something else.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  10. #30
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Ron,

    So why is it that Fuji decided to build such a large compex in South Carolina?

    Or why did BMW put a huge auto manufacturing plant near Greer, SC.?

    The plain fact of the matter is that labor is cheaper in South Carolina than it is in many parts of Japan and Germany.

    What else but cheaper labor could explain the huge Nissan plant north of Jackson, Mississippi, or the Mercedes plant in Alabama?

    Sandy
    Sandy;

    I'll give you the full answer when we get together in June. It is very long and involved.

    Basically, both Konica and Fuji built plants in the US to slit and chop master rolls of film and paper to avoid some of the import duties imposed on "Finished" products. These master rolls could be imported as "raw materials" under a different duty rate and also the Japanese had been caught dumping film, paper and TV sets on the US market.

    At the time the plants were built, Japanese wages were far lower than US wages, and no company could make an inroad in China and the tech base and stability were not there yet in the rest of Asia.

    Long long story which I heard up close and personal from Kodak, Konica and Fuji points of view.

    PE

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