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  1. #11

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    Does it have any practical characteristics that make it worth buying? Presumably Fuji has to believe it has a market for it. What would that market be?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser
    Does it have any practical characteristics that make it worth buying? Presumably Fuji has to believe it has a market for it. What would that market be?

    Virtually any B&W film can be used for making holographs. The success is a matter of the efficiency of the film to interact with the laser light and then form the interference patterns. This BTW includes just about all B&W films anyhow as long as you test them first and use them under optimum conditions of exposure.

    For many years, the Kodak Res Labs lobby had a large hologram on display right near the door. This was done with a normal B&W film AFAIK before there was any such thing as a 'holographic' film. Holograms were made with 'normal' films for years before anyone thought to package 'holographic' films with premium prices.

    There is this bridge in Brooklyn that I can sell you cheap. Anyone interested? Does this help answer all of the questions out there?

    PE

  3. #13
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    Yeah, how much is the bridge?
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    A holographic film is a regular B&W film with a label on it saying it is a holographic film. It makes it look more classy.

    Seriously, if there is any change, it is a change in the spectral sensitizing dye present that is tailored to a specific laser wavelength. Somewhat similar to daylight and tungsten films, holographic films are sensitive to the laser imaging 'color'.

    PE
    Only if you also claim microfilm films to be regular b&w materials with "microfilm" written on the box too. Because really , the holographic plates and films are more or less to microfilm what microfilm is to regular B&W materials. Not all of them are even silver based.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanderx1
    Only if you also claim microfilm films to be regular b&w materials with "microfilm" written on the box too. Because really , the holographic plates and films are more or less to microfilm what microfilm is to regular B&W materials. Not all of them are even silver based.
    Thanks. I was only referring to silver based films.

    As for microfilm and regular film, due to contrast and imaging requirements, you usually cannot use microfilm for normal imaging and you cannot use regular film do make a good microfilm type image. It can be done.

    In the case of silver based holographic imaging, that type of imaging was done and done very well years before any special film of any sort was designed for use with lasers. In the final analysis it is mostly optimization for short, high intensity exposures with a need for special spectral sensitization. But, in a pinch, any number of silver halide B&W films could be used, unlike the situation with microfilm.

    There are a lot of non-silver microfilms around as well, at least there used to be.

    In any event, there are, in my mind, more barriers and restrictions between normal and micro-films but fewer and less strict roadblocks between normal and laser-films. I have actually never witnessed any sort of suitable crossover between the first two but have personally witnessed the crossover between the second two types of photographic imaging.

    Oh, and in terms of microfilm products, they are basically a high contrast fine grained B&W product, so there is nothing special about them except those two aim characteristics, but those aims are very very critical in getting the right image that can be magnified and viewed. Without high contrast and fine grain with low turbidity, you have no micro-film!

    A laser hologram interference pattern is so forgiving that you can literally cut it up into pieces and each piece will reproduce the original image. Now, it is true that there is some degradation depending on the size of the pattern used, but it just illustrates the forgiving nature of a holographic image on film.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    In the case of silver based holographic imaging, that type of imaging was done and done very well years before any special film of any sort was designed for use with lasers. In the final analysis it is mostly optimization for short, high intensity exposures with a need for special spectral sensitization. But, in a pinch, any number of silver halide B&W films could be used, unlike the situation with microfilm.

    PE
    Possibly, but people who do this as part of their jobs probably don't want to do things in a pinch if they can avoid it. As do many those doing things as their hobby. If one was in a pinch, you could do colour photography with narrow band filters and panchromatic film too and later combine to a colour image with extra filtration or possibly digitaly. people still really prefer to use colour film.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    Posted on Fuji website 15 December 2005:

    "Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. (President and CEO: Shigetaka Komori; hereinafter referred to as "Fujifilm") announced that it had developed a silver halide Holographic* Film that can record and reproduce three dimensional (3-D) images using light interference phenomenon. Fujifilm will start selling the product in the US market next month."

    http://home.fujifilm.com/news/n051222.html

    Just to inject some information into this all - there are specs here http://www.slavich.com/technical.htm for the products of one existing maker of holographic matterials, if you are interested in how these differ from the "more normal " materials.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanderx1
    Just to inject some information into this all - there are specs here http://www.slavich.com/technical.htm for the products of one existing maker of holographic matterials, if you are interested in how these differ from the "more normal " materials.
    You will note there that there is no mention of reciprocity nor curve shape which are essential parameters of a 'true' holographic film.

    Hmmmm. Something lacking there?

    When you introduce or sell a product for a special purpose, ALL characteristics for the product that relate to its specific use should be detailed. This inclueds exposure time range and curve shape as well as wedge spectrograms. For further information on this, look at the Kodak web site for such data.

    Slavich may have a very good product, but the data available tells me nothing either way.

    PE

  9. #19

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    Holography

    Hi, I'm an Holographer from Norway. If you have some questions about holography please do not hessitate asking me :-) For the moment I'm making holograms on BB-plates from the UK, but I'v allso used Slavich film from Geola, Agfa and I'm waiting for some film from Fuji. Holographical film/plates are NOT suitable for Photography! Thanks :-)

  10. #20
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    Sorry, but aren't holograms printed on some kind of silvery-looking mylar film? How can a B&W emulsion produce all those color effects?

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