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  1. #11

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    Years ago my Subaru mechanic brought a similar Japanese law to my attention when he pointed out that the engine in my previously-owned wagon was one that had been exported from Japan because it had exceeded 30,000 miles of use. By US standards, 30K miles is just broken in, but by Japanese law, it was time to be replaced. I didn't complain, instead, racked up 300,000 miles on that trusty vehicle before passing it on. So maybe there is a silver lining down the food chain somewhere.

  2. #12
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    Well, yes, Japan has had very stingent laws as to resale of wrecked and used vehicles, with heavy tarrifs or outright sale ban of vehicles past a certain age/mileage. Why is this significant? The automotive junkies have reaped the benefits of this for year: cheap, barely used engines and equipment. People have made huge businesses out of this - its cheaper to go over to Japan, buy and transport parts and sell them here below what North American parts would cost.
    I suspect that the effect will be similar on the electronics market - there will be many nice things available for next to nothing through eBay, and eventually, still at decent prices, through businesses that will take this and run with it. I think it will probably prove to be a positive for us in North America and perhaps Europe (although I don't know how the EU laws stack up).

    Peter.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by gnashings
    Well, yes, Japan has had very stingent laws as to resale of wrecked and used vehicles, with heavy tarrifs or outright sale ban of vehicles past a certain age/mileage. Why is this significant? The automotive junkies have reaped the benefits of this for year: cheap, barely used engines and equipment. People have made huge businesses out of this - its cheaper to go over to Japan, buy and transport parts and sell them here below what North American parts would cost.
    I suspect that the effect will be similar on the electronics market - there will be many nice things available for next to nothing through eBay, and eventually, still at decent prices, through businesses that will take this and run with it. I think it will probably prove to be a positive for us in North America and perhaps Europe (although I don't know how the EU laws stack up).

    Peter.
    I don't know if it's good or not, but certainly it is conceivable that invalid items will flood out overseas and become widely available, which I think is the point of this new law. It forces the domestic suppliers to pay that cost and give up their properties.

    Some people in Japan however have pointed out this is clearly a violation of the Japanese constitutional law.

    The law will certainly hurt a lot of businesses as well as those who rely on the market, which means everyone in the country. In a bigger picture, the medical equipment in hospitals are perhaps subject to this, and if they need repair, they cannot get fixed if they are older than 5-10 years old. That could be tons of hospital beds that have electrical motors, who knows?

    One more thing: Fuji provides photo equipment to schools, but because it's a corporation/business entity, it will no longer be able to deal with its own products past the inspection date. If schools have to pay for the new ones if the old ones break and cannot get the service, that will eventually hurt the schools, students, and the manufacturers, too.

    I know there are a number of people in this site that support companies like Fuji, and I'm telling you if the Japanese market starts to sink because there'll be less and less people able to afford to buy the products, I have a feeling that your favorite brands will disappear before they will remarket themselves to survive.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by kswatapug
    Years ago my Subaru mechanic brought a similar Japanese law to my attention when he pointed out that the engine in my previously-owned wagon was one that had been exported from Japan because it had exceeded 30,000 miles of use. By US standards, 30K miles is just broken in, but by Japanese law, it was time to be replaced. I didn't complain, instead, racked up 300,000 miles on that trusty vehicle before passing it on. So maybe there is a silver lining down the food chain somewhere.
    Speaking of used cars, car inspections are required every 2 years for the cars that are older than 5 years old if I'm not totally mistaken. That costs about 1000 USD just to get a new sticker, which used to be once in every 5 years, I think.

    I received my used Honda from my relatives for free, and can you imagine how much I've been paying just to maintain it run legally in this country? The car has always been a good shape, but I have to take it to a shop so often, and that's just ridiculous.

    In Tokyo, I heard it's even worse. If your car is a vintage type, you cannot pass the inspection because the legislation does not permit the ones that have high exhaust level. Diesel engines are just being eliminated, too.

  5. #15

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  6. #16

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    Firecracker,

    First of all, your use of automobile issue beyond as an additional example of how the Japanese views the safety issue is getting too off topic from your original point of the difficulty anticipated by the used appliance merchants. Your original opinion may lose credibility when viewed by someone who doesn't understand how ridiculous this particular law is.

    I understand what you described all sound ridiculous to you, but I hope you look at them in a different way. I am a Japanese citizen living in the US and there are great many things I found really ridiculous in my 11 years here, but I'm not going to sign in a public website and discuss them. There are already lots of them for both Japan and the US (but those sites for the US are usually written in Japanese or French language, as you guess :-) and there is a series of books called Xenophobe's Guide to Americans, Japanese, French, British, or whatever nationality. You should check out the Japanese and US editions at least.

    For a lot of social issues, there is no single universally applicable solution. Look at the beef problem, for example. I see the points made from both US and Japan sides, and each of them is saying something that makes total sense among themselves. BUT it's a prime example of how the politicians and voters are deeply ignorant of each other's culture. USDA secretary must have a good advisor because he quickly realized something and changed direction, but lower ranks don't appear to.

    On the automobile issue, I pay $30 to get an inspection sticker for checking a couple of things in 10 minutes every year, in Massachusetts. I know some people in Boston who keep their Ohio (or put any favorite state here) plate because their car wouldn't pass the MA inspection. I think that the US system has some problem. You see the problem? If no, I hope you at least recognize that there are different views on many things you mentioned. I agree with you on the used appliance issue, and somewhat on the somewhat excessive inspection requirement, but I can also see that you are applying your own cultural standard to a different land. I don't think that'll help you.

    I think people are generally happy by banning old cars and diesel cars in Tokyo, although the governer is a very controversial one (and he's getting old---he used to make a lot more sense). You should realize how dense that region is. It's not the same as driving a classic car in New Mexico.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnashings
    Well, yes, Japan has had very stingent laws as to resale of wrecked and used vehicles, with heavy tarrifs or outright sale ban of vehicles past a certain age/mileage. Why is this significant? The automotive junkies have reaped the benefits of this for year: cheap, barely used engines and equipment. People have made huge businesses out of this - its cheaper to go over to Japan, buy and transport parts and sell them here below what North American parts would cost. <snip>
    Peter.
    Ah ha... That might explain why I often see adverts for private imports of used Japanese cars that are already readily available here in the UK - usually the only outward difference is the name badge or shape of a number plate. Of course, the fact that the Japanese sensibly decided to drive on the proper side of the road helps...

    Cheers, Bob.

  8. #18

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    Bob, there are also a lot of recent luxury cars solen by Japanese yakuza groups, then exported to Russian mafia. Some company was found that it sold a beaten up fishing boat to North Korea and the boat was modified and used for some special operation. There are lots of these stories. But at least they found these problems...

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryuji
    First of all, your use of automobile issue beyond as an additional example of how the Japanese views the safety issue is getting too off topic from your original point of the difficulty anticipated by the used appliance merchants. Your original opinion may lose credibility when viewed by someone who doesn't understand how ridiculous this particular law is.
    Ryuji-san, about the used cars, that's just one example. Of course it's a little off topic here, but that was just way to expand the discussion if more people would join. I understand what you're saying, and I appreciate for giving me your thoughtful advice and comments here.

    But I originally stated in my first post that this thread for those who are in Japan doing darkroom photography if they're not aware of the changes by the new law. I'm aware that there are at least a few who see this site, and they don't seem to live in the most technologically advanced and accessible areas of the country.

    And I was hoping this topic to ring a bell for everyone who may face the kind of dilemma that I'm going through in a way. It doesn't matter what country it is as long as you're in the photographic community.

    I am, as I wrote earlier thinking of taking this to the point to go on a protest because it seems that it's not working for the majority of the people who are living in Japan. There have been very few articles so far I read, that explains the situation.

    The bottom line is, most importanly this new "badly implmented" law may violate the Japanese constitutional law for the protection of properties, but I'm not a lawyer so I cannot say it 100 percent for sure.

    My main concern is not lose the professionals in the area of photography because there are already enough reasons out there to easily lose them. And I seek the protection of my property as I practice my rights in this country, my native country where I am a citizen of, at least.

    By the way, simple electrical wiring on enlargers can be taught and done by anyone who is not even a DIY expert, but the potential problem seems much deeper than that. That's why I started this thread.

  10. #20

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    Did you or anyone do the research on who voted for this stupid bill when it passed the congress 5 years ago?

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